phevs

Solar is a completely renewable and wildly abundant resource that slashes a household's carbon emissions. And it's something we can feel good about. Ever heard of a catastrophic solar spill? An asthma attack because of a solar panel? A military operation defending our access to the sun? Nope.
Some utility companies are starting to encourage consumers to make the switch to plug-in electric vehicles (EVs).
A poll last year found that nearly half of American households could purchase an EV for their next car; it would be a great fit for their driving needs, and they would have a place to charge it with electricity. We're talking about many millions of people. Are you one of them?
As a way to slash oil use and emissions, we need people to switch from driving to transit, biking and walking -- meaning fewer auto sales and less driving overall. But for the millions who will continue to drive in the near future, we need them to switch to EVs, which are significantly cleaner than conventional vehicles.
In 152 cities and 39 US states, more than 90,000 people attended events last week associated with the 2014 National Drive Electric Week.
Massachusetts and all the other states have a long way to go to reaching the zero emission vehicle goals. In fact, Massachusetts alone will need to sell an average of nearly 27,000 plug-in cars per year between 2015 and 2025 to meet the goal. In the last year, it sold just over 2,000.
I knew the fourth annual National Drive Electric Week would be big, but I didn't realize it would be this big! We're having free events in 135+ cities September 15-21 to share the fuel cost-saving, clean-air, and fun-driving benefits of electric vehicles.