Philip Zimbardo

It was 46 years ago that psychologist Philp Zimbardo conducted one of the most important social experiments of our time — the
Since Trump has given the hate talk main stream appeal and media helped to propagate it by giving him a public platform where
I fear we're reversing the evolutionary process. We've surrendered to simplistic, impulsive, fear-based "safety" and we're reaping the consequences, one broken soul at a time.
Whenever I encounter a systems problem dressed up as individual failing, I look for patterns in the collective situation. In this case, I browsed my library of Fortune magazines running back 30 years. But I didn't need to go back that far.
When it comes to research into human behavior in groups, one of the most notable, foundational studies is the 1971 Stanford Prison Experiment. While it was scheduled to last longer, the experiment was cut short after six days when the guards began to abuse the prisoners.
What is special about the The Stanford Prison Experiment movie is the way it enables viewers to look through the observation window as if they were part of the prison staff watching this remarkable drama slowly unfold, and simultaneously observe those observers as well.
Unlike most filmic reenactments of real-life events in which considerable poetic license is taken to punch up the drama, none is needed for this film because the subjects themselves produced enough gravitas to keep the narrative arc moving toward its shattering conclusion.
Back in 1971, Dr. Philip Zimbardo conducted the infamous Stanford Prison Experiment, in which he put young students in a
God bless America. Flags wave, fireworks burst on the horizon. Aren't we terrific? But this idea we celebrate -- this nation, this principled union of humanity -- is just a military bureaucracy, full of dark secrets.
"Present-oriented people are primed to be addicted to anything, because once they do it and it's good, they can't not do
Creating scapegoats is not without its hazards to the perpetrators or community at large.
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgI believe that our young anti-authoritarians -- our potential heroes -- have far less of a need for hero courses in their schools than a need for help in battling against the systemic, authoritarian aspects of their schools.
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideoMany of the ethical missteps we see in everyday life are made possible when we assign blame to other people ("The cashier gave me too much change, I didn't make her do it").
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgTrained in the Geneva Conventions and the Uniform Code of Military Justice, the military interrogators and guards who tortured and dehumanized prisoners in U.S. custody after 9/11 were hardly without ethical bearings.
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideoWithout dispute, the Sandy Hook shootings were despicable and inhumane. But in light of this clear trend, can we reasonably call the shootings "unimaginable" or "unfathomable?"
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideoViolence and evil are no strangers to our world, and they are never going away. However, if we learn to recognize the sources of derelict behavior, we may be able to intervene and prevent good people from making tragic decisions.