Philip Zimbardo

It was 46 years ago that psychologist Philp Zimbardo conducted one of the most important social experiments of our time — the
Most people don't know who Philip Zimbardo is. I learned about him when I accidentally stumbled on a book that briefly mentioned
I fear we're reversing the evolutionary process. We've surrendered to simplistic, impulsive, fear-based "safety" and we're reaping the consequences, one broken soul at a time.
Whenever I encounter a systems problem dressed up as individual failing, I look for patterns in the collective situation. In this case, I browsed my library of Fortune magazines running back 30 years. But I didn't need to go back that far.
When it comes to research into human behavior in groups, one of the most notable, foundational studies is the 1971 Stanford Prison Experiment. While it was scheduled to last longer, the experiment was cut short after six days when the guards began to abuse the prisoners.
What is special about the The Stanford Prison Experiment movie is the way it enables viewers to look through the observation window as if they were part of the prison staff watching this remarkable drama slowly unfold, and simultaneously observe those observers as well.
Unlike most filmic reenactments of real-life events in which considerable poetic license is taken to punch up the drama, none is needed for this film because the subjects themselves produced enough gravitas to keep the narrative arc moving toward its shattering conclusion.
Back in 1971, Dr. Philip Zimbardo conducted the infamous Stanford Prison Experiment, in which he put young students in a
God bless America. Flags wave, fireworks burst on the horizon. Aren't we terrific? But this idea we celebrate -- this nation, this principled union of humanity -- is just a military bureaucracy, full of dark secrets.
In order to get to any long term goal you have to have plans, an agenda, a to-do list," says Zimbardo. "Future-oriented people