phishing

Cybercriminals are constantly evolving their tax theft tactics and tricks.
Unknown hackers created a fake login page to try to gather usernames and passwords.
Phishing emails may not be aimed at stealing your personally identifiable information or planting malware on your computer
As I detail in my book, Swiped: How to Protect Yourself in a World Full of Scammers, Phishers, and Identity Thieves, there
Every year I dedicate a column to the scams of the holiday season, and every year the roundup gets bounced around the internet -- all too often among friends who've been scammed.
Digital hygiene isn't much different from any other kind, but in the same way parents pass on common sense advice to wash your hands frequently during cold and flu season, it's crucial to learn about your various exposures and how to spot trouble when it happens.
If it is new to you, you might just hesitate and wonder what's the catch. For your kids -- digital natives that they are -- nothing new is suspect. It's expected.
Whilst financial crime threats are growing, companies are still lagging behind when it comes security.
Phishing attacks succeed or fail depending on a number of factors, but the main one is the target's distraction level. Kids are not always the most mindful among us. This makes them targets for phishing scams.
In its simplest form, phishing is the practice of sending a link via email or text or embedding a link on a website that, when clicked, downloads malware onto the user's device as well as any other devices that are connected to the same network. From there, any number of things can happen.
What are they doing about it? Despite these heightened concerns about hacking, user behavior does not seem to align with
To be fair, though, phishers are becoming more sophisticated. The supposed Nigerian prince who wants to give you $50 million
If you're protecting important personal accounts with nothing more than a few security questions, it may be time for an upgrade.
Don't get duped.
$500 Billion is the estimated cost of cybercrime as of 2015 based on various reports. How does that affect business and what fears and opportunities that it present for tomorrow? Let's take a different perspective.
Today, a tweet, a post, or a blog is enough to alert millions in seconds of a dreadful restaurant, an unsafe toy, or a polluting car company. We can share our market experiences in real time. This narrows the space for phishing.
Few things cause more concern than a letter in the mail from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Though the agency sends out letters or notices for many reasons, identity theft is one of the fastest-growing issues for the IRS.
Unethical abuse of communication is not new. The rabbinic scholar, Rabbeinu Gershom, lived a thousand years ago and was considered one of the earliest and greatest scholars of the Ashkenazi Jewish community.
The latest greatest swindlers in the cybercrime racket know you're onto their digital three-card monte, and they've made a few adjustments, putting yet another wrinkle in the corporate-hacking game by targeting top-level employees for major profits.
What happens next probably won't surprise you: The hacker tries try to get money from an account's contact list. They send