pho

People take pride in the food they eat, and ethnic communities especially form and retain their identities around their traditional cuisines. What's Italian without pasta? Or the Thai without their Tom Yum Goong?
The other day I got a text from a friend that read, "Hear about the Bon Appetit pho 'controversy'? Sounds like something you would be interested in writing about to me." That was the first I had heard of the controversy, so I decided to delve into it and see what the hullabaloo was all about. First, though, I had to figure out what pho is.
Bon Appetit just put out a viral new video, highlighting the work of a chef-owner...and, in the process, nearly wrecking his career. The chef is Tyler Akin--a bro with a five o'clock shadow and a telegenic soft-spoken demeanor who looks like he could totally hang out with you at a frat house kegger but totally object to the use of rohypnol.
While the original is made with a roast beef in a French baguette and served with an au jus dip. This version consists of
I know that being Asian is more than being able to speak a language and more than outward appearance. While I've never been proud of it, I know my loss of language is just another narrative in the Great Asian-American Story, and that it's not a narrative exclusive to just me.
The world became a smaller place and Vietnamese pho became as American as chicken soup.
You can't take the street out of the street food.
Stack the burger to your heart's content and prepare to chow down.
What's in a name? In this case, a lot.