Phobia

There's a difference between being afraid of something and having a phobia of it.
A passenger recounts the abject terror of having a huge spider crawl up her leg mid-air.
Envision a desirable future. When the fear of commitment gets too much for you, you have to keep the big picture and long
When we are faced with crisis situations of this magnitude, we get anxious and excessively worry that our sense of safety and security is threatened. We become fearful for ourselves and for our loved ones.
Firstly, let me state that I'm TERRIFIED of Bees and Wasps. Whilst I recognize that this fear (phobia?) of mine is, to some degree, irrational, I've lived with it for forty odd years and gotten used to it. It is what it is, you know?
Many phobias--those irrational, excessive fears that send us into trembling pools of dread--are rooted in evolutionary history.
Sure, you may know you have aviatophobia (fear of flying) or claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces), but what about all those other angst-inducing scenarios and situations that crop up when you're living life on the road?
How to answer to fear is different in every case. What is important is that we do not automatically react to fear by either doing the thing that scares us or not doing it. Fear is just a warning light, there to alert us that we need to inquire more deeply into ourselves.
Some people find holes -- and images of holes -- deeply upsetting, even terrifying. These people suffer from a common but little-known phobia known as trypophobia. As with most irrational fears, the origins of trypophobia are unknown.
Really. What's your phobia? Spiders? Snakes? Are you scared of the dark? Whatever your bugaboo, I have some good news: According