poet laureate

The NFL said the 22-year-old, a star on Inauguration Day, will read her poem before kickoff at the Feb. 7 game.
"Um, wow, you're awesome," the CNN host managed after the poet recited her mantra.
"We will not march back to what was, but move to what shall be. A country that is bruised but whole, benevolent but bold, fierce and free."
The Oklahoma native is revered for her writings on "tradition and loss, reckoning and myth-making," as well as for her music, the Library of Congress said.
You can help "Half-Mexican" poet Juan Felipe Herrera write about migrants, peace and language.
Without people, no language. Without language, no real thinking. Without thinking, no real feeling. Without a web of connectedness
Juan Felipe Herrera shares some beautiful reminders about this multifaceted emotion.
For Juan Felipe Herrera, the first Chicano to be named U.S. poet laureate, migration is both his biography and a major component of his poetic style. The child of migrant farm workers, Herrera grew up following harvests from San Diego to San Francisco, and his writing has likewise displayed a remarkable range.
1. Work with Your Hands: There is something satisfying about handiwork, because you can see the physical results of your labor. Whether you're baking bread, knitting a scarf, or weeding your garden, making something with your hands can set your mind on fire.
The daughter of a free white man and an enslaved black woman, she sued for her freedom. Through petition, her case was sent to the Virginia General Assembly and she was freed in 1656.