political philosophy

Rafael Caro Quintero, aka “The Prince,” is a fugitive on the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration’s most-wanted list. The alleged leader of the world’s most powerful drug cartel gave an interview while hiding.
So you're not surprised to find him as the author of the book Reclaiming Liberalism: And Other Essays on Personal and Economic
This is a version of a section of the sermon I delivered last year on Yom Kippur. While I wrote it originally before any
Purim is most closely associated with costumes, triangular pastries called Hamantaschen, and howls of hatred each time the name of the Jews' genocidal nemesis, Haman, is read from the Book of Esther.
In response, the part of our collective psyche that is governed by tribal conditioning is contracting defensively, hardening
No country in the world today stands as a fully Socialist state, but rather, some of the most successful economies combine elements of Capitalism with Socialism to create greater degrees of equity and lesser disparities between the rich, the poor, and those on the continuum in between.
The Berggruen Institute is partnering with universities around the world to inspire new ways of thinking about global politics and reward innovative ideas that make a cultural impact. Founder Nicolas Berggruen joins us live.
After reading Rand's most famous work, Atlas Shrugged, I find my thoughts on politics and life profoundly inspired. Her characters and philosophical convictions are unapologetically pragmatic and simply refreshing. Rand's work reminds me of an important lesson: haters will hate.
There's a passage in the acclaimed novel The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky that has resonated and haunted me for decades.
Have you been paying attention to the news lately? If so, I'm sure some of it has depressed you. Just as history has made us believe that the human race has made progress, reality will tell you the awful truth that we have not come that far at all.
Conservative doctrine can no longer afford to fall victim to poorly constructed books and films or, for that matter, "talking heads" who risk negating the very real contribution that this political philosophy has and can continue to make to our society.
His students weren't the usual liberal-minded suspects--who represent a significant swath of Iran's educated classes, incidentally. He taught Mill to largely conservative-oriented students in an institution that cranks out apparatchiks for the Islamic Republic.
In this time of provocative and suggestive "quenelles" and bananas hurled at government officials, of rancid hatred and incendiary clamor, of generalized resentment and vindictive rivalries, we have forgotten a word that badly needs reinventing. That word is fraternity.
CBGB is about the rejection of utilitarianism. The details of the punk style -- the lewdness, the filth, the screaming protests -- it's all secondary, man. Despite the dastardly lip-syncing in the movie, that point comes through quite nicely.
On Tuesday, November 5th, protesters wearing Guy Fawkes masks demonstrated in more than 400 cities around the world in celebration of Guy Fawkes day. From Barcelona to Tokyo, hundreds of thousands protested in the streets and on the internet against political corruption, corporate greed and NSA spying. Despite the explicit thematization of the mask, almost no commentary so far has taken seriously the political meaning of these masks.
Disruption necessitates exploration and uncertainty, which means that "trying new things" is not merely a well-worn cliché but an urgent moral imperative. It is, it seems to me, sacred.
The dramatic turnaround in views about same-sex marriage says hopeful things about Americans' capacity for tolerance, empathy, and fairness, and about our willingness to prize family in all its forms.
Why has the Libertarian Party -- and more importantly, the much broadly based new liberty movement -- failed to make a significant electoral impact, despite its recent tailwinds?
Haidt maintains that when we confront a moral or political question, our first reaction is intuitive. We use reason to defend our intuitions rather than to form them.
Under a non-compulsory voting system with fewer people voting, smaller lobby groups can easily sway a small section of the people to the polls and thereby manipulate the outcome of the political process.