poor children

As American leaders were implementing these "silver bullets," high-performing countries were building "comprehensive systems
We believe the country and its citizens are better than that and the appropriate solution is to do all we can to help these poor kids in crisis by embracing DOE's regulation. In our opinion, that should only be the starting point, however.
In the first blog, we introduced the concept of grit and its importance. In the second, we placed the focus on building grit
This is the second in a series of five blogs that we will post on grit and what it means for poor kids.
Regardless of whether it's "key" or "essential", the question becomes how does one get grit? Who and what helps to build the "passion" and "perseverance" necessary for success? These questions are important for any one at any age.
In an election year that finds both the left and right clamoring for political change, then, it seems suicidal for the Democrats to be putting forward a candidate who is as much a creature of the establishment as Hillary Rodham Clinton is.
Where are the neighbors? Where are the schools and community organizations? Who reaches out to see what the problem is? Does anyone see this child/youth desperately in need of help and hope? Who listens or offers a helping hand amidst the violence and despair they face daily?
Poor parents aren't bad parents, and we aren't always miserable either. I'm not going to sit here and tell you that I want to remain poor for the rest of my life. Like the vast majority of people, I want the best life for my children. But I'm a little tired of seeing only the bad side of being poor.
During my childhood I was aware that I was different in color from the majority of people around me, but my father and mother emphasized brainpower, not color. Color was what you were, but not using your brain was a choice.
In the House and Senate budget proposals for fiscal year 2016, passed with only Republican votes at the end of March, there are big winners and big losers. The big winners are defense spending and contractors and very wealthy people and powerful special interests. The big losers are children, our poorest group in America, and struggling low- and middle-income families.
If we compare Black child well-being in America to child well-being in other nations, the U.S. Black infant mortality rate exceeds that in 65 nations including Cuba, Malaysia, and Ukraine. Our incidence of low-birth weight Black infants is higher than in 127 other nations.
"This is the moral shame of our community," San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo told CNN of extreme poverty among kids. "It is incredibly
For fifty years Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) has been the primary source of federal funding targeted to schools to serve poor children. Sadly, from the beginning states didn't keep their end of the bargain.
Something is deeply awry in our nation with the world's biggest economy that lets its children be the poorest group and the younger they are the poorer they are during their years of greatest brain development. The Prince of Peace is mocked as we let a child be injured or killed by guns every thirty minutes.
Through daily moral consciousness we must all counter the proliferating voices of racial and ethnic and religious division that are regaining too much respectability over the land.
For the first time in 13 years, the DOE now makes clear that states, school districts, and schools must make education resources equally available to all students without regard to race, color, or national origin. This is some of the unfinished business of the civil rights movement and a giant step forward for poor children, often children of color.
It is a moral disgrace that child poverty in the U.S. is higher than adult poverty, higher than for children in almost all other competitor nations, and higher than our country with the world's largest economy should ever allow.
Now that one school year is over and we are preparing for the next, June is a month of reflection for educators and parents on how to do better next school year.