portraiture

I find myself agreeing with this. I believe the portrait has meaning when we're moved by the humanity of the people in the portrait. And by the raw power its story tells. Here's one such story.
Photographer Pete Barrett is on a trip, and it's a long one. For the past six months, Pete and his family have taken to the road for an indefinite trip around the country as Pete delves into a photographic journey to shoot "The American Worker."
For a moment in time, he takes his subjects out of the reality of their lives and elevates them from the ordinary to the majestic, from people with no power to people of nobility, from anonymous to celebrated.
Without fearing the unknown, kids from around the seafaring metropolis have learnt to celebrate the essence of life.
This post originally appeared on the 500px ISO blog. When it comes to portraits, it's hard to argue against the saying, "it's
"I am blue, the colour blue for that paves way for communication -- an intangible element that works for most of us associated with the shooting world," expounds this lensman who ties a perfect knot of his red Pumas.
When it comes to photos of couples in love, these "smile and kiss" shots make up the bulk of standard snapshots of their lives. But let's slow time down for a moment. And smell the roses.
To see more of Galiya's work or license any of it for your next project, head over to her 500px account, take a tour through
It does not come as a surprise that in times of the 'selfie', portraiture as an artistic genre seems to be a casualty. The thing is that painting portraits takes far too long. We just cannot hold our attention for that long.
The Lagos-based Osodi has made a name in the international art scene for his documentary photography, which has focused on the human and environmental costs of natural resource exploration.
Now, perhaps more than ever before, black people are joining forces and standing up for their rights and recognition. Yet, there is still disharmony within that same united front when it comes to accepting our transgender brothers and sisters.
After getting to know Nina through Caleb's eyes, I wanted to find out a few more things to share. I asked Nina to oblige
"Fetching Blemish" runs until February 15 at INVISIBLE-EXPORTS in New York. The other artists on view include Wolfgang Black
In this globalized world of consumption we live in, rarely do we stop to think about where our goods actually come from, who cultivated them or what life is like for the people at the beginning of the production chain. When you open a pack of sugar and empty it into your tea or coffee, do you ever consider the process of how that sugar ended up on your table? Do you ever think about what the people are like at each step of the production: the cultivators of the fields, the owners of the land, the processing plant workers, the packaging designers, the marketing team, the distributors, the transporters, the wholesalers, the retailers, and ultimately you, the consumer? I do all the time, to the point where I make up complete stories in my mind that could turn into a screenplay.
The important thing, what truly motivated me in producing this work, after endless research and a good deal of sleepless nights, is the fact that all my subjects were to keep their eyes closed for those very long six seconds that picture-taking required
We can agree with de Pury on his assessment of the current state of contemporary art; a dreary phenomenon that's been coined
Chicago artist Marla Friedman's recent portrait sculpture of the legendary Apollo 13 astronaut Captain James A. Lovell, Jr
Ultimately documentary is not always about tragedy or the lost -- sometimes it's about unexpected kinship, and embracing the heartfelt and familiar. Sometimes, simple beauty is the most in need of being documented.