post-911-america

As a playwright, I relish the abundance of serious drama on offer in what many consider the theater capital of the world; I also admire how seriously Londoners take their theater.
Our collective psyche has been shaped by the experiences of living in post-9/11 America, and future generations will be forced to wrangle with questions of identity, history, shame and our place in America.
With more people than ever holding Top Secret clearances working for more than 3,000 government agencies and private security firms, our intelligence network has sprawled beyond control and beyond our capacity to even account for it, much less to use it effectively.
We can be conflicted between ideals and application and struggle to implement our values into our lives and policy. This raises serious questions about what it means to live as followers of Jesus in an increasingly diverse post-9/11 country.
As we reflect on 9/11, can we feel the intense pride and gratitude that Joseph felt when he faced his aggressors? Can we tell these evil forces: You wanted to divide us but we are more united than ever.
I believe in an America that will overcome these difficult times in the next 10 years and help create a better future for people of all faiths (or people of no faith), be they Christian, Jewish or Muslim.
The National 9/11 Commission executive summary begins; "At 8:46 on the morning of September 11, 2001, the United States became a nation transformed." Transformed we are indeed, to a new normal that is a more worried normal. But is it a wiser normal?
I am convinced that America was ready for change. I am convinced that this was the time for change. I am troubled that our political leaders seem to be fighting to keep their world as it has been for decades.
Orhan Pamuk's The Museum of Innocence will be interpreted by clueless reviewers as one about "obsession," just as they might view Nabokov's Lolita to be about "pedophilia."