post grad

Love is solution-oriented. It finds a way to make things work. Self-deprecation is rarely fuel for solutions.
Do something you love, then it won't be work. But don't stop there. Take your hobby to the next level by doing it as much
As G-Day gets closer, seniors all over the country are being asked the dreaded question, "What are your plans after graduation?" Family members, friends, and even strangers have the best intentions in asking this; however, if you don't have an answer, it can bring about the longest 30 seconds of your life.
If you're soon to be a college graduate (what's up class of 2016?) and on the job hunt, here's some advice from five successful young professionals on how to land your first job out of college.
The key with exploration is to welcome and embrace it. Don't expect instant answers, don't force yourself into a box created by others, and most importantly don't force yourself into a box you created.
“Considering everything else that goes on in life over those 30 years — marriage, raising a family and building a career
Teachers, of course, can lead the way, not toward some false utopia embodied in the privatizing, anti-union, agenda of the testing moguls but in education's humanistic roots -- providing young people with multiple pathways to success.
It begins when you leave, for good, for the first time. You turn to your roommate, at a party, or the dining hall, the week after orientation, and you tell them you're going home, and you immediately catch yourself and say, I mean, back to the dorm.
When you leave the classroom and head to the meeting room, don't be afraid to experiment or fail. Those mistakes will undoubtedly direct you toward experiences and opportunities that will have great impact on your career and life.
Just because you don't have a job the moment you walk across that stage doesn't mean your diploma has gone to waste. It takes some time to find a job post-grad and you're not alone.
The key here is to start investing in a Roth IRA as early as possible - then invest in a traditional IRA as you begin to earn more. By doing both, you are maximizing your retirement savings and planning for a very solid financial future.
Just simply having a job or an internship is not enough. Even if it's at the biggest company in the world with the best salary possible for your field, it' s still not enough. In order to be successful, you must demand more -- and no, I don't only mean more pay. I mean more out of the experience.
Senior year marks another big transition for every college student. But whether or not you're prepared for the changes you'll soon encounter, you can take comfort in the fact that the job market is looking up for new grads.
Everyone my age has some dangling worry trailing around after them everywhere that they're somehow not doing everything, that what they're doing is not altogether the right thing, that they are missing out. The doubt is natural, and everyone you know -- yes, even that person -- carries it sometimes too.
The years spent in college are a time of personal growth, invaluable education, and a plethora of new experiences. We live, we learn, we discover. The awesome part is that this process continues beyond these four years-- it's lifelong.
You say: “Let’s talk.” More broadly, encourage your friend to connect the dots in terms of her passions and hobbies. “The
Even if you are newly graduated and daunted by your new life as a "real adult," don't be afraid. Your college self is still there somewhere (probably in your heart and somewhere in the damage to your liver).
My hope is that by forming good habits early on and sharing them with others, I can do my part in establishing a new baseline for a generation as it begins to tackle the "real world." We have it in us to be successful and to help others, but we must first do all we can to help ourselves.