post-modernism

"South Park" is not anti-change. It’s anti-doctrine.
What we have today is a West that is retreating militarily and shrinking economically, yet one that still speaks as the lord and master in command of the fates of nations and continents.
It is impossible to conceive of post-modern poetry without Robert Creeley. And poetry -- in whatever iteration it is in right now -- has not been the same since Creeley died in 2005.
Even more than art, design shapes how we experience our surroundings and ourselves. Think about it: art, almost by definition, abstracts from the details of everyday life; design shapes them in the most immediate way.
I was occasionally in the presence of the wonderful photographer Irving Penn in the 80's. I will never forget a simple statement he made then, "I keep getting better the older I get because I do learn more as I go along."
Stern calls 15 Central Park West "a gigantic articulated wall of structures not a series of twisting and turning isolated thing." The name 'Limestone Jesus' comes from the fact that the building is constructed with limestone bricks.
Frederic Rzewski's The People United Will Never be Defeated is one of those pieces that seems to have popped or plopped out whole and near perfect.
In the spirit perhaps of no good deed goes unpunished, the Museum's present decision to sacrifice the contemporary if not categorically orthodox modernist Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects Folk Art Museum is nonetheless a record of the increasingly blurred narrative of late 20th and early 21st century aesthetic constructs.
Credit goes to President Obama for not allowing binary logic to force his hand. His decision to take the issue to Congress created space for a conversation with the American people about what to do.
Postmodernism puts the Bible and truth on trial. Since there are many controversial issue of our society that involve postmodernism and the Bible, it is quiet clear that both are vying for the right to be the final authority on these issues.
There is no time like the present to live in the future.
To me, Michiko Kakutani's latest review is emblematic of the ongoing cultural war between those adhering to the tenets of modernity: irony, cynicism, minimalism; and those who obstinately refuse to bow before these pestiferous ideals, those who honor beauty, truth and emotion. Kakutani obviously falls into the former.
I've been a fan of Yerpe's extremely cool -- one might say icily cool -- work since I first saw it in 2009. For me, a lot of what makes art good is the degree of interesting thinking I have in response to viewing it.
2012-08-09-johnseed123.jpg Eclecticism is beautiful because it allows every label, every approach, every style and every work of art to be allowed into the ring of possibilities.
Little did I know that I was about to visit a country where the manufacture of national identity is not only overtly artificial, it has become a major industry. Going to North Korea is like seeing the mirror used in a magic trick.
While there are limitations in drawing conclusions from our celebrities' lifestyles, Matisyahu's choice does represent an important development in the underlying psycho-spiritual evolution of our time.
Art, like language, morphs words and tones to describe the world. It can be a reflective, interpretive, literal, and/or emotional. Important art passes the litmus test of time. It remains in the pop culture lingo to mark the space from whence it came.
In its infancy, our little blue orb was a perfect place serenaded by little more than the swoosh of winds and the ebb of ocean tides. Enter humans.
I remember very clearly the first time I really heard the music of the Beatles. I was eight years old in 1995. The Anthology series was about to be broadcast and I was somewhat baffled, but equally intrigued.
When I want to spend an hour or two with the most culturally radical show on TV--a multi-racial, multi-cultural program where race, gender and sexual orientation truly don't seem to matter--I watch "So You Think You Can Dance".