post traumatic growth

Here are 3 things you can do to help you channel your deep pain into an opportunity for your greatest growth:
Receiving kindness can be just as sweet as giving it. May you enjoy both.
Once I hit college, I began dating a little more, but I was terrified. I wasn't just terrified of guys; I was terrified of
I had just taken a new job. A 22-year-old waiting tables -- living in my head, scheming for the future. My plan was to save money, move to Thailand and go on an adventure. Fifteen minutes before walking through the doors of the restaurant, my cardiologist called me.
Psychologists studying post-traumatic growth find that many people come to thrive in the aftermath of adversity.
Don't diminish your response to the adversity itself. You have to go through a difficult emotional processing period before
All of us face trials in our lives. How can you respond to your crucible to transform your deep feelings of loss -- which are real and natural -- into opportunities for personal growth?
Researchers have documented PTG in combat soldiers, people who've been disabled by accidents or illness and survivors of
For those who have suffered since Newtown and for those who predictably will suffer in the months to come, a few lessons learned in hindsight from one Newtown Resident.
An extraordinarily stressful experience, such as war captivity in early adulthood, can reverberate throughout a lifetime and influence later well-being, but many factors shape the outcome.
Except for a few rough patches, I've been blessed with a pretty healthy, pain-free life so far. So when debilitating pain like this comes along, it whacks me upside the head like a cosmic mallet, as if to say, "Pay attention! There's stuff to be learned here."
Recovering from loss takes time but there are ways to treat our psychological injuries. Caring for our emotional wounds will help accelerate the recovery process so we emerge from our loss with our lives, identities, relationships, and beliefs intact.
While I don't think anyone with a chronic illness would chose it, many of us have found it has added something to our lives we're not sure we want to give up. And in many ways, it has made us the best of ourselves.
We must all become more aware of how to better protect our children and how to recognize and report abuse. We cannot save them all, but maybe we can open our eyes just a little more today to the realities and suffering of children in our midst.
I was sad, my ex-husband was sad, our three children were sad. Divorce is the very definition of trauma. A bomb explodes in the middle of your life and you're left, shell-shocked, wondering what in the hell happened. How did we get here?
Cost was not an issue on any level because the benefits Kramer catalogs lean toward the sort that no amount of money can buy: peace, love, serenity, humility, happiness, redefinition of faith, and more meaningful relationships with others. How does one arrive at this summation, to view and accept a brain tumor as a great gift?
Survivors can learn to avoid worrying about the small stuff and attend to the awe and wonder all around us. But how does this dramatic transformation happen?
We know that suffering is amplified when we don't see it coming, when we don't have any control over it, and when it's something we've never had to deal with before. All of which makes Stacey Kramer, and those who respond to suffering like she has, even more remarkable.