preeclampsia

Sympathetic followers had lots of advice for the singer and "Dukes of Hazzard" star.
She and Kanye West welcomed a child via surrogate this week.
The 37-year-old mom feared she had a tumor. Turns out she was 31 weeks pregnant.
The number of women diagnosed with preeclampsia has been rising since 1980.
When you’re dealing with a sick child, you should not have to worry about insurance.
You saw clearly my need for rest and relaxation during such a stressful time.
I thought we'd be at the ER for a few hours at most. Those hours turned into four days, followed by a return to the hospital two days later as the partial abruption gave way to steadily rising blood pressure and it became clear that I wasn't going home before the baby arrived. I had come face to face with severe preeclampsia.
Time travel is tricky business. Life's a tangled mess of good days and bad, and sometimes those moments come back around when you least expect them. We've created a world where everything is documented and recorded, and sometimes we face a little fallout in the midst of all the cat photos and Instagram food.
To begin, preeclampsia is a disease that affects pregnant women, often presenting itself with high blood pressure, high levels of protein in the urine and swelling of the legs -- symptoms all discoverable via routine evaluation during prenatal care checkups.
When I was pregnant with my first child 17 years ago, I had the usual worries compounded by my knowledge as an obstetrician and high-risk pregnancy specialist. I knew first-hand the impact of prematurity and other complications. Like other moms-to-be, I hoped to deliver a healthy baby. As a research physician, I was eager for evidence-based knowledge to make this a reality.
When I became pregnant, I planned and researched everything from the best infant car seat to the top-of-the-line strollers. What I didn't research turned out to be the most important thing I wished I had: preeclampsia.
he lived in a very rural area, and did not have much family here. Honestly, she was very young, very poor and very uneducated. But here she was in front of me, flushed, sweating and swollen. I was still a new nurse, just off of orientation, but even I knew that something was very wrong
I felt like a failure. I'd had two children; the first got cancer and now the second one was probably going to die because I couldn't hold up my end of the bargain. I'd brought our whole family back into the world of sickness and worry. The guilt was all-encompassing.
I am ashamed to admit that I struggle to remember everyone's names, to separate the stories, but I feel the weight of their belief in the Unexpected Project, to share their stories and to make a difference for their surviving daughters, sisters, nieces and granddaughters.