pregnancy discrimination

Recently pregnant professionals share the comments that raised questions about their capabilities on the job.
Yes, this sort of discrimination happened in the 1970s, when Elizabeth Warren was a teacher. But it still happens today.
In the wake of scrutiny over the presidential candidate's own story of losing her job, the senator urged other women to come forward. So they did.
Eryon Luke, a certified nursing assistant from Louisiana, was fired from her job in 2012 after becoming pregnant with twins. Today, her legal case may determine how other pregnant and breastfeeding women are treated in the workplace.
Women in every industry reported on by the EEOC filed charges of pregnancy discrimination, including those that employ the
It's hard to overstate the problem. When a woman who was denied abortion coverage cannot keep her job because her employer
Today is the eighth and final Labor Day the country will celebrate with Barack Obama as its president. As we pay tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity and well-being of our nation, it's well worth taking a moment to appreciate this president's deep and enduring commitment to equal opportunity for women in the workplace and the impact it has had.
When the National Partnership for Women & Families issued its first Expecting Better report in 2005, the world was a very
Until we, as employers, figure out how to permit our employees (women and men) to step away from work when needed and inject some balance into their lives, we will have employees like Meghann Foye calling for the folly of me-ternity leave.
Dr. Samantha Decombel says her invitation to give a lecture was revoked due to her pregnancy.
he PWFA would afford pregnant workers with limitations arising from pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions the same clear and familiar right to accommodations as workers with disabilities. They, too, deserve to participate fully in the American Dream.
If attitudes lead to beliefs (stereotypes), and stereotypes lead to action; employers should pay close attention to the rights of their workforce to assure no action is discriminatory.
As someone who works everyday on pregnancy discrimination cases, I have seen time and again cases where white-collar workers are reticent to seek legal help or pursue civil cases, even in the face of blatantly illegal behavior.
The ability of women of color and immigrant women to lead healthy reproductive lives is an integral part of the right to self-determination in all aspects of their lives and inherently impacts their economic security and independence.
After deliberating for approximately five hours, the jury delivered the headline-making verdict, finding that AutoZone's action so outrageous that it should be punished by having to write a check for $185 million.
Women and families thrive in direct proportion to the support they receive. And an essential pillar of that is implementing the federal policies -- including paid parental leave -- that provide the safety net necessary to effectively manage the challenges of raising children and working.
In the struggle for equal rights at work, much remains to be done. Advocates recognize that despite existing federal and state protections, pregnant workers in this country still face discrimination when denied reasonable accommodations that would otherwise enable them to continue working and support their families.
The case's effects on pregnant workers overall is not immediately clear. But as an experienced attorney dealing with these kinds of cases, I believe that it will ultimately help make the playing field a little more favorable for workers who have faced discrimination.
The United States Supreme Court today issued a decision that bolsters the case for the passage of the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act (PWFA) in Massachusetts. The legislation is sponsored by Hadley-based MotherWoman and supported by a coalition of advocacy organizations across the state.