prenuptial-agreements

So it's your wedding day and you're about to say those two little words. There's something niggling at the back of your mind that you've haven't got around to organizing... Food? Ordered and paid for. Presents for the in-laws? Check. Prenup? Ah. Oops.
Here are tips for spouses who, while not actually contemplating a divorce, may want to be as fortified as possible if ever that unfortunate day arrives.
Short answer: Yes! Long answer: A prenup, or prenuptial agreement if you're being fancy, is a contract between two people who are getting married.
People need friends and community. They're lonely, either literally or shut off in their marriages or families. So many marriages become cold places, and people need to connect. They feel shut off from those around them, so they reach beyond.
Whether or not you're the one petitioning for divorce, it's a good idea to do all you can to coordinate your affairs and look out for your interests. That doesn't have to mean being underhand or dishonest -- just smart.
It is often argued that prenuptial agreements reflect a lack of trust. However, we live in a trust but verify era of relationships as illustrated by numerous background check services.
Strengthening the shared commitment and practicing mutual generosity, compassion, honesty, kindness, and respect are all ways of maximizing the likelihood of not only staying together, but of experiencing greater fulfillment over time.
When couples marry for the first time -- increasingly in their thirties -- they aren't saying "'til death do us part" any more, but making up their own conditional standard of commitment, like, "as long as we love."
A well-drafted prenuptial agreement can prevent future heartache in the event of a divorce, even if the couple does not have a lot of money.