PrEP

PrEP has been shown to reduce the risk of HIV for people at high risk by up to 92% — but it's vastly underutilized.
Depending on where you live, you may be able to get a prescription online.
The New York Times spoke to gay men who said they were denied insurance coverage for taking PrEP, an HIV prevention drug.
The move is being praised by a number of LGBTQ advocacy groups.
A New York City physician has documented a case in which a male patient taking Truvada (tenofovir/emtricitabine) as pre-exposure
We must strive to continue not only raising awareness, but also advocating for access for gay men who have been disproportionately impacted by HIV for far too long.
AIDS guilt for men of my generation isn't a thing so much as it is an implant. We're punished for that too, not by our peers but by our millennial friends, understandably not wishing to be defined by death.
Together we can crack the code to equality, and this is just the beginning. Progress happens when we all work together, and we're excited to be a part of the journey.
Researchers from the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University unveiled a new website, www.preplocator.org, that
The PrEp for Women Initiative aims to reach 5,000 women and 300 doctors in D.C. to increase knowledge and PrEP awareness through social media and traditional marketing over the next two years.
"This is both an equality and science issue, that effects us all on so many levels. We have the ability to save lives and do what’s right.”
If the terms safe sex has lost all meaning it shouldn't be a cause for alarm. It should be seen as an opportunity to shift the conversation away from safety and responsibility and instead talk about pleasure and desire.
So in the waning moments of a chilly NYC Sunday morning in early May, you pick yourself up, spot your pants in the distance, and find in them the trusty Pilot Razor Point pen that was supposed to have prompted you to crank out the Great American Novel by the first quarter of 2016. You take that pen, and you make a list of Spring Resolutions.
Our best hope for reducing and ultimately ending HIV transmission is to ensure people know PrEP is an option for them.
Providing sexual health services, including PrEP to youth is not only possible, but necessary. Embracing best practices, developing networks of care and advancing advocacy efforts can assure all youth have access to the HIV prevention methods that work for them.