president recep tayyip erdogan

Some Turks say they’ve lost trust in the country’s military. Others are worried they’ll be rounded up in mass arrests or targeted by terrorists.
Officials say Tuesday night's suicide bombers hailed from Russia, Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan.
For Erdogan, coalition government and power-sharing remains anathema. It is a concept he does not understand, grasp or accept. According to Erdogan's world view, politics remains a zero-sum game of winner-takes-all.
VIENNA -- The success of the mainly Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party in capturing 13 percent of the vote in the recent election -- a total well above the party's core constituency -- should boost the Kurds' confidence and ease the way ahead in the peace process. But the far-right Nationalist Movement Party performed strongly in the election, capturing 16 percent of the vote, probably owing largely to popular opposition to the opening to the Kurds.
Turkish police raided media outlets and detained journalists nationwide on Sunday in operations against what President Tayyip Erdogan says is a network conspiring to topple him. The detentions came days after the government-sponsored bill was signed into law that made it possible to arrest suspects based on "reasonable doubt."
It is not a secret that the Turkish government suppresses the media, but the tools they invent to punish the free press are pushing boundaries.