presidential veto

Obama vetoed the bill last week, arguing that the bill "conflicts with established executive branch procedures and cuts short
President Barack Obama formally vetoed legislation authorizing the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline on Tuesday, the latest development in what has become an ongoing standoff between him and congressional Republicans over approval of the controversial pipeline.
This is only the third veto of Obama's presidency, but it's likely not the last. Congressional Republicans are poised to
Some in the pundit class are falling all over each other with predictions that House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi -- and the Progressive forces she leads -- have somehow been banished to irrelevancy by the outcome of the mid-term elections. Wrong.
WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration on Monday threatened to veto farm legislation that would cut billions from the Supplemental
If members of Congress choose -- for the first time in our nation's history -- to codify a system of indefinite detention without charge and authorize such confinement on the basis of suspicion alone, they will do so with their eyes wide open.
Imagine a very different Constitution -- one where Congress could kill any state law, where a twenty-six member Senate controlled treaty-making with other nations, and where the president's veto was exercised jointly with the Supreme Court.
Barack Obama understands that the country wants a president who acts. And as the new, Tea Party-tainted Congress is spoiling for confrontation, now is the ideal moment for a true veto strategy.
Oil costs are rising, and the Bush administration's response is to pull the plug on homes that can't afford the market-priced heat.
So this is the point. Bush's argument is explicitly ideological. He wants children to get sick and die in order to prevent