principal

William Latson was reassigned from the school in Boca Raton after an outcry over emails to a parent saying "not everyone believes the Holocaust happened."
In a heartfelt letter, Shannon Daniels opens up about her journey to authenticity.
My visit with Jason followed on the heels of some extensive research I was involved in, to gain a better understanding of millennials' financial habits. That research illustrated a number of key themes that highlighted how to help millennials save money and prepare for the future.
My visit with Jason followed on the heels of some extensive research I was involved in, to gain a better understanding of millennials' financial habits. In addition, we also investigated the role (or lack thereof) a financial advisor plays in helping millennials plan and save. The results? As varied as their personalities.
I recently had the opportunity to spend some time with Jason Dorsey, chief strategy officer for The Center of Generational Kinetics. Known as the Gen Y Guy, Jason is an acclaimed keynote speaker, generational researcher and best-selling author.
Just because employees are hardworking and loyal doesn't automatically mean they are financially astute and do a good job at planning for retirement, nor does it mean newer employees are bad at managing their money.
Campbell said the administrator's experience resonated with students, who have been caught being kind so many times the photographs
This leaves principals and school administrators tasked with conducting teacher evaluations in a rapidly changing educational environment that can be unfamiliar if not altogether intimidating.
Another student, fourth-grader Donovin Allen, told the source, "As soon as it snows, I'm going to go out there and just wear
If you could go back 30 years and give yourself one piece of advice regarding retirement planning, what would you say?
If you want to grab the attention of the millennial generation, you need to personalize and tighten-up your communications approach -- which frankly, is how we should have been doing it all along.
A recent study by the U.S. Government Accountability Office indicated that "some 155,000 older Americans are now seeing deductions from their Social Security checks to pay off their federal student loans - up from 31,000 a decade ago."
There is some good news. There is one group of people out there feeling successful and optimistic, even in the midst of all these alarming events. Who are these naïve, yet hearty souls?
If you are a financial advisor, embrace the web and leverage digital learning to enhance your value proposition. Dedicate time to identify good videos, websites, digital books, webcasts, online classes and search terms related to financial planning.
While you may not have time to read a book on financial planning or have the expertise to use elaborate financial-planning software, I would encourage you to take advantage of the amazing amount of free educational content available online. There are plenty of quick, bite-sized moments of learning that can have a material impact on your financial future.
Here are my top three things to consider if you're trying to encourage millennials to save for retirement.
The moment we're faced with deciding whether to take a lump sum often happens at the moment of retirement, which also means it's the moment our paycheck is turning off. Similar to a light switch turning off.
At the moment of retirement, our paycheck stops like a light switching off. (Click!) For many, Social Security checks are significantly lighter than a regular paycheck, and yet, most of us still do next to nothing to adjust to this new reality.