Private Lives

These married celebs prize secrecy in their private lives.
What do you get when you cross Noel Coward's Private Lives with the Cole Porter-Samuel Spewack-Bella Spewack Kiss Me, Kate? You get cross. That's what you get.
When you look over the plays Noel Coward trumpeted during his fabulous career, few give the impression of being in any direct way autobiographical.
Some plays need to look as if they're being performed with absolutely no effort whatsoever. They must seem merely tossed off. That's the fun of them. Perhaps the most famous example is Private Lives, the jazzy romantic comedy Noel Coward wrote in 1930.
The headlines cross: a royal baby, DOMA, exiles, violence, words from the Holy See, and suddenly I am thinking about Edward II. I directed the Marlowe play 13 years ago, and now, in the midst of a whirlwind of social and political shifts, I find footing by fixing my thoughts on this history play.
Forget Lindsay Lohan -- it's Helena Bonham Carter's turn to try to impress as Elizabeth Taylor. The queen of eccentricity
How often do we hear about the boyfriends/girlfriends, fiancés, spouses, or even the one-night stands of our straight friends and co-workers? Yet as soon as LGBT people enter into the discussion, love and sexuality become a matter of a person's "private life"? Give me a break.
Caleb Cole describes himself on his website as "a former altar server, scout, and 4-H Grand Champion in Gift Wrapping." He
Sometimes theater thrives on the simplest pleasures. A couple actors on a bare stage. This was the case at the last event for Carnegie Hall's young donor group, the Notables.
Last week, it took in $327,173 at the box office from a potential haul of $854,405. Attendance also was around 54 percent