prog rock

The "Jimi Hendrix of keyboards" died Thursday night.
With roots in prog and indie rock, Seattle-based four-piece band Gumshen has been striving to create a truly one of a kind sound. They have achieved their goal by elegantly swan diving into the world of EDM and electronica.
If I ask you to picture a big band, chances are you close your eyes and see Bono or Chris Martin or Donald Fagen (just me?). Give that first word a little more, though, lean on that "big" and you get a whole different thing.
Nearly a year later, I recently sat down with him to talk about his first solo record, The Ghosts of Pripyat, (now available on iTunes), among other subjects. We also touch upon Postcards from the Road, his book of photographs.
Few musicians, lyricists, and vocalists can move an audience as profoundly as Steve Hogarth of the English band Marillion
Today I sit down with John Wesley to talk about his excellent new album, Disconnect. We also touch upon Rush and Marillion, among other topics.
Ghost is a sextet that describes itself as a cross of "death metal and pop music." There are certainly some elements of metal in their music, but nothing that even comes close to the skin-flaying assault of bands, for example, like Meshuggah, Dark Funeral, and the covens of fellow travelers in this genre.
"The audience has very distinct opinions about what The Outlaws are, what their music should sound like, what the shows should represent. "
A founding member of a group so progressive that the label "prog rock" wasn't even invented when the group formed in 1968, Chris Squire continues to persevere long after others have come and gone.