progressive christians

The election results are mobilizing Christians who say Trump doesn't represent them.
These are contentious times when it comes to the junction of religious faith and politics. Whether the issue is poverty, same-sex marriage or abortion, there is remarkable division even within the Christian world.
As you may have heard, eight churches of various Protestant denominations in Fountain Hills, Ariz., have put aside their usual interchurch rivalries and come together in order to combat an enemy common to them all: progressive Christianity.
In the deepest recesses of his heart, Fred Rogers was an unabashed universalist who believed that God never gives up on any of us exactly because we are all essentially good, valuable, and lovable: God is the Great Appreciator, and we are the greatly appreciated.
It's time for progressive Christians to claim discipleship. It's time to get radical, not about our politics or our policies, but about our faith. It's time to stop throwing the baby Jesus out with the bath water, and start putting the horse before the cart.
Inclusive and expansive language means I get to hear the poetry of today and yesterday and my capacity to imagine God at work in the world expands. I wish the new generations of clergy in The Episcopal Church would take a page from the mother church I witnessed this week.
What happens around tables designed to encourage the people of God to see one another, face to face? I would argue that justice, too, begins on a micro-scale at our church.
Where are the progressive/moderate Muslim voices? That is a question progressive Muslims often hear. We are present and have been speaking up for years but first a brief description what makes one a progressive versus a conservative Muslim community.
Moderate to progressive Christians aren't the ones in the news talking negatively about women, and gays, and evolution. But we're also not the ones in the news talking about women, and gays, and evolution in positive ways, either.
I've often found that the most vital churches are the places that do Lent the best. They're the places that don't shy away from acknowledging the messiness of the spiritual life.