progressive-movement

Compromise is what Bernie Sanders' opponent (and the political establishment) wants us to do. If we compromise, they'll throw us a breadcrumb every decade or so. And if we wait a few centuries, we might just be thrown enough breadcrumbs to garner an entire mouthful of bread.
Let's clear something up: Hillary Clinton is no progressive; she and the New Democrats were barely even Democrats to begin with. Their rise to power in the 90s came at the price of embracing the laissez-faire economics and racial politics of the Reagan Revolution.
The Black Lives Matter movement promised to be the medicine to our ailment: to take racism head on and crush it.
With 2016 fast approaching, things look bleak for the GOP. Pandering to a non-white voting block could very well end up costing it the South, as it did to the Democrats in the 1960s. At the same time, pandering to base will alienate too many groups to win in a general election--not the least of which are Latinos.
In response to the midterm losses, many progressive are asking what we can do to win elections. How can the progressive community deal with problems like inequality, climate change, immigration, and mass incarceration when we can't decide who serves in office?
After 1950, Detroit began to shrink, the first break in its sensational upward trajectory. What happened? Some blamed the end of the war, but America was pouring billions into the Interstate Highway System. The world wanted American cars and trucks. The causes of decline must have been internal.
When we fail to realize the beauty of people like us fighting to make the lives of others better, we fundamentally diminish the humanism of our work.
If all or even most of this class of women senators were to win in 2012, it would be historic, easily the highest quality group of new women senators ever. Progressives should do everything we can to rally behind them and help carry them to victory.
It's not just our legislative fights and our progressive principles that make us part of the "new progressive movement." It's also a style of politics that is infused with hopeful energy, and partners with community members.
If you believe that the progressive movement should be independent of Barack Obama and the Democrats, then the decision to work with them should be made strategically. There are times to oppose them, but there are also times to support, encourage, and persuade them.
Republicans claim to value the military, but it appears that many don't actually respect what the military values. If they did, they would be crawling over each other to understand and bolster our non-military, diplomatic security programs.
As a journalist who has covered the right for more than 15 years, I see a profound threat in the rise of the Tea Party movement. There are thoughtful progressives who see things differently.

One blowing oil well is more real and compelling than all of the lies and noise the right has generated in the last 17 months put together.

I'm happy for union workers who've earned "better" plans through collective bargaining. But I'm somewhat unsympathetic on the subject when most of us working stiffs can't afford any plan at all.

Popular action is the very definition of democracy. It doesn't happen without us, and it isn't a human right upheld by some magic fairness-fairy. If the public option's not in the bill, it's because we haven't shown up to demand it.
Most Americans are unaware that much of our patriotic culture was created by people with decidedly progressive sympathies.
Hope was a fine slogan when rooting for a long-shot presidential candidate. But as a posture toward the president of the most powerful nation on earth, it is dangerously deferential.