Proportional representation

For many younger Lebanese, Sunday brought a first chance to vote in a national election after parliament twice extended a term that expired in 2013.
Perhaps the time has come to launch a modern 21st century conversation, ten years long, about our election procedures, our governing mechanisms, and the 18th century constitutional structures bequeathed to us by our founders.
Simply put, in our current political system there are very few opportunities for women to run for office and be successful
After the chaos of the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago, Senator George McGovern and his colleagues developed a series of reforms to the primary system, including getting rid of many "winner-take-all primaries" for his party.
Across the nation, Americans are frustrated with divisive politics and elections in which they feel as though their voice goes unheard.
Imagine what Congress would look like if voters could realistically vote for not just Republicans and Democrats, but also the Tea Party, the Green Party, the Libertarian Party, the Constitution Party, or the Socialist Party.
Range voting eliminates spoilers and splitting the vote between two good candidates. It gives voters a chance to show how much they dislike someone, rather than just being silent. For these reasons, Range Voting is superior to Instant Runoff Voting.
It's not just about the specific projects, but also about having a strong voice in the ongoing operations of this multi-billion dollar agency.
We present a detailed analysis of two ways that Judge Lewis can ensure congressional elections this November take place in districts consistent with the state constitution, with minimal disruption for voters and election officials.
The United States Congress has careened into a government shutdown, and everybody wants to find someone to blame. But in the accusatory frenzy, they're missing the real culprit: the voting rules that drive the political behavior of Congress.
What we ought to do is scrap this system and replace it with one consisting of four major parties. Even this will not cover all Americans, but it will certainly encompass more of us and within a more rational framework. For what might these four major parties stand?
If Jonathan Bernstein is right in his response to Hasen that a broken Republican Party is the real source of government dysfunction, fair voting would give Republicans the right incentives to get their party back on track.
It's time to take legislative action to place regularity constraints on the shapes of districts; this would work better to combat gerrymandering than the current requirements for contiguity and population balance.
Democrats cannot win a majority of House seats without winning dozens of seats in Republican-leaning districts. Republicans, meanwhile, can win a healthy majority of House seats without winning any seats in Democratic-leaning districts.
Looking at turnout in primary elections, both this year and over time, points to one of the particularly disturbing realities of participation in the United States.
Last week's federal court ruling that Texas's 2011 plans for congressional districts and state legislative districts had both the purpose and effect of further reducing the representation of Texas's already underrepresented racial minority populations is just the state's latest salvo in the redistricting wars.
Apart from a few celebrated and important leaders, the data on women's participation in American political institutions do not paint a particularly rosy picture of rising political power for women in the U.S.
This reflects a basic pattern in American society where we want the latest technology for our computers, televisions and cell phones but we complacently trudge along using archaic voting technology while ignoring the improvements that have occurred since the late 1700s
Winner-take-all voting incentivizes partisanship, compels centrists to squeeze into restrictive ideological boxes and rewards the "us-versus-them" mentality moderates resist.
Clearly winner-take-all amplifies partisanship and polarization in Congress; it is therefore antagonistic toward the goal of achieving a more collaborative and collegial legislature.