proposition-37

2012 was an up and down and altogether historic year for the food movement. In order to succeed in 2013, the movement needs to incorporate more voices from throughout the food chain and think creatively about how to unite across traditional boundaries.
There has been plenty of discussion about ensuring informed choice, but why does this matter? Well, food and the food industry are increasingly complex.
The food movement learned a valuable lesson in the failure of Prop 37: We can't outspend Big Food and we can't out campaign them, but we can outsmart them. Let's not wait for government to cut ties with Big Food. Let's cut those ties ourselves
Independent doctors and scientists have warned about health and environmental risks from GMO foods, yet our federal regulators have let us down us by allowing these risky new foods to go unlabeled. Californians have the chance to address this situation by voting Yes on Prop 37 next week.
We know it's easy to get sunk by "information overload" and agribusiness advertising. So far the largest GMO maker, Monsanto, and other industry giants have plowed at least $35 million into keeping us in the dark.
On Election Day, California voters will decide on Proposition 37, which would make their state the first in the nation to require the labeling of food products containing genetically modified organisms (GMOs).
Following an explosive and controversial French study indicating a link between Monsanto's controversial genetically engineered corn and cancer, Russian authorities have suspended all imports and use of GMO corn. And it's not just Russia that's appalled by what's been learned.
It seems many people confuse the "right to know" with the "right to buy." Many people want to avoid foods made with GE, and fortunately there are ways for them currently to do so.
On Nov. 6, California voters will have the opportunity to vote on historic Proposition 37, which would mandate the labeling of genetically-engineered foods. But Monsanto and its allies are dedicated to keeping consumers in the dark.