prosecution

If the mainstream media hopes to recover public credibility, it should begin by voluntarily adopting the equivalent of SEC Rule 10b-5 to insure reporting all of a story, not misleading fragments.
News of John McLaughlin's death last week took me back twenty-seven years to the time when he moderated A Matter of Life and Death, a TV show that Ward Sylvester and I produced that was seen by large audiences in more than 200 television markets.
In 2015, the highest-ever number of convicted prisoners were exonerated of the crimes for which they were incarcerated, according to a recent report by the National Registry of Exonerations.
The first award is for what has become a routine example of dishonesty and cowardice by DOJ. Its conduct should be a scandal of national proportions, but by now everyone expects DOJ to embarrass our nation when it deals with elite bankers.
Like his uncle, Brendan may be guilty. Unlike his uncle, his conviction rests entirely on the coerced confession of a frightened, mentally-challenged boy badgered by grown men wielding badges and guns and uniforms and loud, firm voices.
Though complicated and varied factors contribute to the overuse of jails in our communities and the disproportionate jailing of people of color, prosecutors' actions can and should play a leadership role in addressing these problems.
A week after promising to crack down on corporate crime, the Obama administration may have gotten its chance with Volkswagen.
As we acknowledge the year anniversary of Michael Brown's death, local district attorneys are no longer an invisible force, untouchable by advocates who traditionally have focused on police alone.
In one fell swoop, and a unanimous one at that, the Supreme Court in Ohio v. Clark both helped ensure child abusers may be successfully prosecuted, and resolved several open questions about the scope of the Sixth Amendment confrontation right.
As of 2014, Cosby, or anyone else who allegedly committed rape and sexual assault, was home free in 34 states that had statutes that ran anywhere from 3 to 30 years for filing rape cases depending on the circumstances of the sexual ravage.
This case will likely have significant legal challenges that are belied by the confidence of Ms. Mosby's presentation and the relative breakneck speed at which she filed charges. After listening closely to the press conference, I believe there are five big takeaways.
With the announcement that GM Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra received the outsized compensation of $16.2 million in 2014, what should have been a year of humiliation and soul-searching for that feckless automaker instead ended on a disturbingly self-satisfied note.
Basically two things happen in court -- people try to get someone else's money or the government tries to get someone's freedom. People taken to court are either at risk of losing cash or going to prison.
Because there really are no cookie-cutter criminal cases or fungible criminal defendants, we need juries to act as a counterweight to legislative and political incentives that drive us toward a one size fits all criminal justice system.
A Crime of Passion is the 7th Joe Dillard thriller. In this novel, Joe is hired to defend a record company baron accused of murdering a young country music star. He finds himself amidst a web of lies so byzantine, he may never learn the truth.
If US officials tortured people, and we know torture is, was and always has been illegal, why isn't the government prosecuting them? Maybe there's some complicated legal reason that isn't obvious to most of us why the evidence wouldn't hold up in court. If so, it's in the government's interest to explain what that is.