prosecutorial misconduct

The ruling affects all drug cases tested at the state lab between 2009 and 2013.
“New York will be the first state to show it will no longer tolerate the unethical and immoral actions of District Attorneys who abuse their enormous power in the criminal justice system."
Prosecutors are generally immune from accountability. A new joint initiative from Civil Rights Corps and the ACLU seeks to change that.
Having prosecutors police themselves is like having a hungry fox guard the henhouse. In almost all of the cases of exoneration in recent years, prosecutors have fought tooth and nail to maintain these false convictions knowingly and intentionally.
On behalf of the many innocent people in prison, I ask: why are the crimes that have been committed against us continually being swept under the rug of injustice?
In exoneration cases over the last two years, prosecution misconduct was responsible for 75% of the wrongful convictions.
Innocent people shouldn't have to suffer from underfunded attorneys. These attorneys need to be fully funded to be effective for those who cannot afford counsel.
Lorenzo Johnson served 16 and a half years of a life-without-parole sentence until 2012, when the Third Circuit Federal Court
-Rain was elected in 2013 after a vicious campaign in which she accused the incumbent District Attorney Nicole Duve of incompetence
When society can't trust the police who are supposed to protect and serve, it's a serious problem -- one that needed to be addressed a long time ago.
Prosecutor Angela Corey made a name locking up juveniles, securing death sentences and failing to get George Zimmerman convicted.
After sixteen and a half years in prison for a crime I was innocent of, the U.S. Third Circuit Court of Appeals vacated my sentence on the grounds of insufficient evidence--which is equivalent to a "not guilty" verdict--and ordered my immediate release, barring a retrial. I was released and reunited with my family.
The vast majority of prosecutors are true professionals, keenly aware of their immense power and its consequent responsibility. They form accurate conclusions on guilt far more often than the converse. Still, cognitive bias and overconfidence touch us all.
A courtroom is a place where justice is supposed to be served. More and more, however, courts are becoming crime scenes -- here, innocent people are being kidnapped and held captive.
Once again, John Giuca's bid for a new, and much fairer, trial than he had in Brooklyn ten years ago has been frustrated after an evidentiary hearing in which the prosecution's star witness admitted he lied at Giuca's trial and the prosecution's misconduct was further exposed as a brazen effort to hide the truth from the jury.
Our criminal justice system continues to fail innocent prisoners because of the structures and statutes that legislators refuse to change.
What's interesting about this decision, however, isn't just the re-opening of one of the most widely covered criminal cases of the past 50 years--it's the opportunity to cast light on how the prosecution's conduct deprived Mr. Guandique of his constitutional rights.
It seems incontestable that Louisiana's criminal justice system is in a state of collapse. The state judiciary appears to be oblivious to violations of the constitutional rights of criminal defendants; prosecutors continue to violate the rights of accused with impunity, especially by suppressing exculpatory evidence; public defenders are so overwhelmed by huge caseloads they have refused to take new cases; and the state prisons have the highest incarceration rate in the nation.