public financing

Public financing elections can now come to California.
What if "endorsement" is a political red herring? "Endorsing" suggests approval, but for a lot of us that option is closed. But, hey, we still have to choose--we must choose because democracy itself is at stake today.
I conducted the following interview yesterday, before the convention actually started. Denise Merrill is a Connecticut delegate (although not, as she pointed out to me, a superdelegate) and serves Connecticut as their Secretary of State. A recent achievement was the state becoming the first to pass a campaign finance reform law which created a public financing system for elections -- all the other states with such laws created them through ballot initiatives or referenda.
House Speaker Paul Ryan released a new "anti-poverty" plan last week that would only make it tougher for poor and working families to get by. As expected, the plan cuts from public programs that help low- and moderate-income Americans, while protecting tax cuts for the very wealthy.
The goal for all working families remains a secure, sustainable job and a real improvement in our standard of living. Here's how we get there.
On April 14 and 15 I had the pleasure to co-host, together with the World Bank, the first annual forum on Resource Mobilization for Universal Health Coverage. Even though this sounds like a mouthful I can assure you that the topic is extremely important for all of us working in global health.
A repaired presidential public financing system would dramatically increase the amount of clean resources available to participating candidates and thereby greatly dilute the importance and impact of outside spending groups and their mega-donors.
Talk about 'growth' in Latin America has become less upbeat today than a few years ago. That's no surprise. For over a decade, average growth meant at least double the economic activity that we are seeing today.
Last night's Democratic presidential primary debate in New Hampshire included the first question on campaign finance policy so far in the 2016 race.
In his State of the Union, President Obama called for "reducing the influence of money in our politics." Fantastic. He has heard the growing cry of the 85 percent of us who want big changes (with almost half of us wanting a complete rebuild!) in how America funds elections.
If Hillary Clinton wants to light up the country in either the general election or the primary, she needs to take a leadership role -- not a lip service role -- in a basic, in-the-guts overhaul of how politics works in this country.
A bipartisan coalition will work to reverse what one said was "destroying us from the inside."
The passage of public financing ballot initiatives points a way forward for reformers.
Publicly funded candidates will now have more resources to fight back against super PACs.