public shaming

"We find something new to be outraged about online" every nine seconds, the host of "Last Week Tonight" says.
The need that our country has to make cruel comments about another person should be a wake-up call.
The Missouri legislature is currently considering the enactment of legislation that would define frozen embryos as human life.
Have you ever been in line at the grocery store and received a sideways stare from the cashier? Maybe he/she gave your extra absorbent pantyliners a smirk or your beer and condoms a second look. Take a look at how I handled that situation.
The scarlet letter as a form of punishment is back, it's just not written in red anymore; it's written in Tweets, and Facebook posts, and blogs, and shares. Only it's even worse, because the punishment can be permanent -- you can never take it off.
Users of the affair website could face long-lasting emotional trauma.
The decision to sleep on a train is yours to make. The fact that I was asleep does not, in any way, excuse the drunk man's behavior. We need to respect people, especially in our shared spaces. We need people to keep speaking up. Not only for ourselves but for those around us as well -- we are not alone!
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The truly committed, heinous online asshat must believe that he or she is really speaking for the silent majority. That each like really represents one percent of the American public. That, deep down, they are not being awful. Of course, if someone really wanted to stand out, they could always try behaving with some degree of decency.
In an age when interpersonal communication is primarily driven by digital technology, it is indisputable that bullying is already back -- and that it has taken the form of digital public shaming.
I do not assume that my personal life choices are so fundamental that other people are less human or will live less fulfilled lives because they don't make the same ones.
"Daughter is a spoiled brat and doesn't deserve these tickets," Cindy Bjerke wrote in a post on the Fargo/Moorhead Online
Can we stop supporting the exploitation underage people within the "gotcha" media, please? Youth deserve our protection more than anyone, and the current landscape of media reporting does little to ensure that the livelihoods of underage persons are protected.
Social media teaches us that there is no buffer between what people do in their daily lives and what is put online. However, parents must see the bigger picture, and opt not to publicly shame their children on social media.
A child is likely to view the parent as an "enforcer" versus an "ally," Kohn added. It could also make the child believe