publishing industry

That number includes both digital and hardcover pre-sales.
Accept the fact that more than half of the people who visit our page won't actually read what we have to say. Adapt to the
Deep Patel wrote and published a business book called A Paperboy's Fable at age 16. I asked Deep how he was able to achieve
The Supreme Court's recent decision to deny review of the Authors Guild v. Google, Inc. ruling was a blow not just to the suit's plaintiffs in the book industry but to all of us in the business of writing and publishing content.
Over the past month, I have fielded numerous inquiries about book development and promotion, so I figured it would be helpful to share with you my tips for both. In this first installment, I'll focus on the starting point question of whether to self-publish or pursue a mainstream publisher.
It's about time that readers -- and the media, which breathlessly repeats the best-selling claims of these authors -- wised up. So let me show you exactly how I became a became a #1 Amazon bestseller for $3 and a photo of my foot in less than five minutes (with screenshots and proof).
We've all witnessed the explosive growth of social media during the past decade. Now, a growing cadre of sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Vine, Instagram and others are morphing into professional publishing platforms.
As I reflect back on those wonderful days, this is what has become clear to me. An essential factor in the success of a self
If you're an unknown quantity, and you aren't sleeping with someone at a literary agency--or even if you are, in some cases--it's virtually impossible to get face time with a publishing professional, be it an agent, editor, or publisher.
Much of what we thought motivated web users in the beginning, such as speedy pages, has now become a hygiene factor that you simply must have, but which won't motivate a customer to become a loyal follower.
Nothing makes my mom prouder than when she hears me introduced as a "Best Selling Author." Know who else is impressed? Prospects and clients. The title "Best Selling Author" doesn't go away, and in my experience has never lost its luster.
Just about every news outlet is looking to capture your attention when you wake, amassing email lists, analyzing the open rates and trying to steal your valuable time away from the competition. All to get you hooked.
Getting your book published is no longer a 'wait-and-hope' proposition. There are so many ways to get published today that no author has to go through the process of submitting a proposal (non-fiction) or a full manuscript (fiction) to literary agents and endure the agonizing wait to see if it's accepted by them and then wait some more for the agent to make a deal with a publisher.
“We have to make magazines compete for us.”
"What's the opportunity here?" This is the phrase that was playing in my mind after a conversation with my daughter, who is, in her own right, a talented writer and editor -- with the possibility to also become a publisher in the future.
It's called Lady Pancake & Sir French Toast, and it's a ripping barnburner full of outlandish action, heroic and dastardly characters, roller coaster rhymes and some absolutely fabulous illustrations by Brendan Kearney.
For my column, I'd rather talk about the Muppets -- ok, ok, I'll eventually make my way back to the great Ad Blocking Controversy of 2015, but let's start with the Muppets, Jim Henson's invention from the '50s that changed children's television forever.
Spend time crafting and perfecting your book so your storytelling shines. Invest in a high quality editor who is well-versed in your genre and can help take your book to the next level.
We first met Ann Ralph when she won our Pitchapalooza with one of the great elevator pitches we've ever heard: The Elements of Style for fruit trees. It made total sense even as it was counterintuitive.