pulitzer

Ahead of the Tonys, Lin-Manuel Miranda nabs another big prize.
"I like plays that feel like somebody took a fun house mirror and put it up to the real world, and it's sort of reflecting back a version of it to you. I find that, in looking at that reflection, you can start to understand a little more about your life."
Karen Pittman has stolen so many scenes, she should've been locked up years ago. I mean that figuratively, and man that opening line, which is still going on by the way, was pretty lame.
It's all about how millions of Americans who may have been thrown out of their homes, or at least forced to stress about the possibility, were denied access to information that might have revealed how widespread the foreclosure problem was.
It's the rare journalism movie that gets it right when it comes to depicting the day-to-day on a daily newspaper.
On the few occasions that I was lucky enough to hear Maureen Dowd speak about Mary McGrory publicly she always seemed to
"I have a reason to do this. I represent a branch of people. When I go somewhere, I represent them. They are not just a story. They know I care, because their story is my story. The light that they are cast on, gets cast on me. I have a responsibility."
Secrets and lies carried the day in most of the five films I saw Monday at the Toronto International Film Festival. But then, aren't the most interesting movies built around them? It's so obvious that Mike Leigh used the idea as the title of one of his finest efforts.
Kilman's "The need for moderation: Encouraging civil discourse online" (courtesy WAN-IFRA) It published a picture of BuzzFeed's
This work is a 343 page offering that with a flick of a switch floods light onto the dark side of the sex abuse scandals within the Catholic Church.