pyramid scheme

A former Mary Kay consultant recounts how the multilevel marketing company kept her loyal, even though she wasn't making any money.
Multilevel marketing companies sell women on the dream of being their own boss, yet as many as 99% may end up losing money.
Prosecutors say the stash is part of a pyramid scheme.
And he enlisted the help of actor Jaime Camil to warn bilingual audiences.
At night, they toss and turn not because of potential threats from their competitors, but from worrying about those two proactive
Keep Reading: 5 Money Scams to Avoid This Year For example, Galka said hedge funds that invest in pharmaceutical companies
The song is simple in its meaning. I was basically trying to describe a feeling of trying to get someone to feel something
I cannot stand by when a company like Herbalife has the audacity to publicly proclaim they provide opportunities for Latinas -- neglecting to mention that it is under investigation by the SEC, the FTC and multiple state Attorneys General for intentionally targeting and scamming Hispanic customers.
Under Operation Choke Point, the FDIC has warned banks against working with firms that defraud people. Working with fraudsters
The battle for the future of Herbalife has been raging for over a year after prominent activist investor Ackman accused the
If Herbalife is profitable, why should anyone be concerned? What does it matter if the company is a pyramid scheme, some wonder, so long stock price keeps going up?
Would you not expect the stock to gradually move upward from there? And so it did.
I tend to like nice guys. Don't we all? One of my favorite investors is John Templeton. Years after his death, he's still acknowledged as an exemplary person and great investor. But you don't have to be adorable to be a good investor.
Bill Ackman claims Herbalife is a pyramid scheme, and he makes a good case for it. But even if you don't buy his argument, there are other compelling reasons that would make many reasonable people run far and run fast from this company.
Early Wednesday morning, three women from two tony towns on the Connecticut shoreline received visitations at their homes by Federal Marshals. Each woman had been charged with multiple counts of defrauding the Internal Revenue Service, filing false tax returns and wire fraud.
The story here isn't Stanford. The story is the SEC. Why should individual investors trust they are getting due protection when evidence of regulator corruption is all around them?
Quixtar, a former subsidiary of Amway, one of the largest multi-level marketing (MLM) companies in the world, has agreed to a $150 million class action settlement.