qatar 2022

Efforts to leverage Qatar's 2022 World Cup hosting rights to create the soft power the Gulf state needs to punch above its
"Our marriage changed me. It took me outside my bubble, and made me question our culture's values. I didn't understand why
This article first appeared as an E-Note of the Foreign Policy Research Institute. Some perspective on these responses emerges
Qatari authorities and FIFA, world football's governing body, were quick to dismiss our findings when we published them last month. But when FIFA's new President Gianni Infantino visits Qatar this week, he must confront the issue head on.
The fair trade movement and concern about ethical sourcing asks consumers, all of us, to think more carefully about what we buy, and to ask hard questions about how producers behave. Air travelers who believe they are people of good will, people who embrace the Golden Rule, should ask the same question when booking a trip.
They argue that Sheikh Tamim, who took office after his father, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, stepped down in 2013, has begun with the reshuffle to move the old guard aside and pave the road for change.
Earlier this month, at a press conference in Los Angeles, the CEO of Qatar Airways, His Excellency Mr. Akbar Al Baker, once again said he and his airline were being "bullied" by U.S. airlines, notably American and Delta.
Words but no actions. That is Amnesty International's evaluation of promised Qatari labour reforms on the fifth year of the awarding of the 2022 World Cup hosting rights to the Gulf state.
Never missing an opportunity to shoot itself in the foot, 2022 World Cup-host Qatar has adopted a new law that is more likely to convince critics that it aims to put a friendly face on its controversial kafala or sponsorship system rather than radically reform a legal framework that trade unions and human rights activists have dubbed modern slavery.
World Cup host Qatar is discovering the reputational risk involved in hosting high-profile mega sporting events. Qatar Airways' sponsorship of FC Barcelona is producing exactly the kind of publicity that is a corporate sponsor's worst nightmare while a Swiss investigation of the Qatari World Cup bid threatens to expose questionable financial dealings that will fuel demands for withdrawing the tournament from the Gulf state.
Qatar's 2022 World Cup is promising to be a rare example of a mega sporting event that leaves a legacy of social, political and economic change - but not in the way the Gulf state's ruling family had imagined.
2022 World Cup host Qatar has announced a series of reforms to improve working and living conditions of its majority migrant labour population that address material concerns but fall short of recommendations made in a government-sponsored study and demands of trade union and human rights activists.
A Qatari acquisition of Tottenham would no doubt at least temporarily refocus some of the negative reporting on the country. But it could also revive assertions that wealthy Gulf countries are seeking to launder their reputations through soccer acquisition.
Qatar, caught in a Catch-22 between a requirement to quickly reform its labour system in a bid to convince human rights and trade union activists that it is serious and the need domestically to proceed slowly, risks losing goodwill it has built in recent years.
Israel appears to be mobilizing a grassroots campaign against Qatar's hosting of the 2022 World Cup as part of the Jewish state's effort to isolate Hamas, the Islamist militia that controls the Gaza Strip, and bolster the fortunes of the Palestine Authority of President Mahmoud Abbas.
Krisna Upadhyaya and Gundev Ghimire, British nationals of Nepalese origin, vanished in Doha as they were about to leave for the airport. They were in Qatar to investigate labour rights on behalf of the Global Network for Rights and Development (GNRD), a Norway-based group with alleged links to the UAE.
Lusail is currently under construction in Qatar's "waterfront desert" along the Persian Gulf. Government officials say they
Both Qatar and the UAE have been in the firing line for their treatment of foreign workers who constitute a majority of their populations but operate under a sponsorship or kafala system that puts them at the mercy of their employers.
By glorifying the world's worst human rights offenders and endorsing them to host public displays for an international audience, we help countries like Qatar keep the profitable business of slave-keeping alive.
To many people, and certainly to FIFA and the IOC, sporting concerns do not, or at least should not, overlap with political ones. This viewpoint is troubling because it downplays the social price of sports.