Quartet

One of the lessons professional journalists have learned over the years is that objectivity and balance can sometimes be wrongly used. If, as a journalist, you are witnessing rain, you are not obliged to report that one side says it is raining and the other side says it is not. You have an obligation to your audience to tell it simply that it is raining.
Winnie: I would recommend the queen mother herself. Yes, Queen Elizabeth II. ­­Classic, yet royally understated. That is
The report that was recently released by the Middle East Quartet - comprised of the United States, Russia, the European Union, and the United Nations - is a welcome step. Perhaps most crucially, the report concludes with a pointed observation.
It was the finale performance of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra's New Creations Festival opening night on Saturday and to be honest, the whole night threw me off guard.
During several meetings I recently had with EU officials, they argued that it is time to revive the Middle East Quartet. I took the opposite position because I believe that the Quartet failed from the onset to breathe new life into the peace negotiations. In fact, it has become a major impediment to the peace process.
But the country has invited 19 other countries and the Arab League to the peace talks.
The enduring impasse between Israel and the Palestinians in the peace negotiations and their changing internal political dynamics has made it impossible for them to resolve the conflict on their own.
The prospective Israeli-Hamas truce presents a momentous opportunity, albeit in disguise, for all parties concerned to turn a new page in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and change its geopolitical and security dynamics, which succeeding Israeli and Palestinian governments could build on.
When you look over the plays Noel Coward trumpeted during his fabulous career, few give the impression of being in any direct way autobiographical.
Admittedly, the situation at the moment looks grim: After months of negotiations, a dozen personal visits from the secretary, and countless trips between Jerusalem and Ramallah, Israel is announcing new settlements and reneging on its agreement to release a small number of Palestinian prisoners this weekend.
I went to yet another violin shop this weekend. The fine violin shop cliche is a beautiful space in a prime location with oriental rugs and antiques peppered throughout.
What greeted their mortified cellist in the wings, after having caused the ultimate concert disaster, was not anger but gales of hysterical laughter and a tidal wave of empathy. Knowing that I could not possibly have felt any worse, their instinctive reaction to see the funny side of situation saved me.
Over the past thirty-four seasons my world has grown to enormous proportions of extraordinary depth and richness because of the places and people now as familiar to me as my own home, and in some cases, as my own family.
As more than 1 billion viewers gear up to watch the annual Academy Awards this Sunday, it struck me that we have two Oscar Best Picture contenders and one movie overlooked by the Academy but chock full of Oscar gold players and a first-time director which represent some of the most poignant caregiving moments brought to film in 2012.
Maybe it was just the particular media I happened to watch this week, but I have been thinking about chemistry. (No, not the kind I couldn't pass in high school.) But a different kind of chemistry. And what I am finding is that coupling among 'mature' adults does not necessarily connote sedate or boring.
4 popped kernels (Scale: 0-4) When an elderly opera diva moves into a retirement home for musicians, there are old revelries
We had marvelous actors -- Tom Courtenay and Maggie Smith and Pauline Collins are at the height of their powers. And of course
Life is dull without music. Dustin Hoffman's movie Quartet is the perfect occasion to dust off your old instrument and start playing.
We need people in "human resources" to realize that you're still "human" when you're over 50, and to be trained in how to recruit and train employees who are older than them.
January is traditionally a spillover month for late-December releases, almost all of them vying for critics' awards and, of course, the Oscar. There are some worthy candidates this year, along with well-intentioned films that suffer from what might be called December Bloat.