Queer writers

"I just wanted to write a silly little romance," says Jane Eaton Hamilton on the phone from Canada, about her new novel, Weekend
Millennial writers are seeking what writers have always been in search of: comfort and connection, reasons for existence and answers to the unanswerable. They will keep reading and writing and they will keep improving, and inexorably, they will become old writers and readers--and, hopefully, will urge on the generation that comes next.
When I heard about his latest book, I decided that it was time to read Edmund White. As a lesbian writer, I have very little in common with White, but as I kept reading Inside a Pearl, what I found was an Edmund White I could relate to -- one who could lay his life on the page.
Love makes the world go round. And when it comes to LGBT civil rights, love is what all the fuss is all about. Two recent books from Cleis Press (both published in 2013) brought the idea of love to the forefront of my mind, in very different ways.
Explicitly stated or not, all of the interviews with the poets in my book, I believe, are affected or influenced by the many ways in which gay men encounter each other--intimately, antagonistically, as mirrors of each other's social position and history, or just as old friends.
My interview with Koestenbaum can read, at least in some moments, like flirting, or even cruising. There's double entendre; there's performance; there's even a moment in which we cozy up over one of his books, tracing fingers over line after sexual line of poetry.
"We didn't have any LGBT list at all when I started as acquisitions editor [at the University of Wisconsin Press], but the real leap for us was incorporating more trade titles into our list.... And once I got the OK to do trade titles, I just saw so many strong LGBT titles going unpublished."
Unfortunately, it is safe to assume that had the U.S. Supreme Court not reached its verdict in 1967, many states would have kept their laws against interracial marriage for as long as they could.
You should not read Annie Lanzillotto's L Is for Lion: An Italian Bronx Butch Freedom Memoir just to learn how to catch a
While A Horse Named Sorrow is a meditative tale set in San Francisco, Faun focuses on an adolescent boy discovering that his body is quickly morphing, but not into the expected stage of puberty. Healey was able to take some time with me to discuss his work and inspirations.
I am extremely proud of my identity within the LGBTQ community, and publicizing Queer Greer is currently one of my favorite joys. I readily characterize myself as a "queer" writer, irrespective of the topics I am writing on at any given time.
Recently, a few of us connected to discuss our craft and the state of gay literature today. It was with great pleasure that I joined with Gregory G. Allen, David G. Hallman, Carey Parrish, and Arthur Wooten in our own gay take on the Algonquin round table.