Rabbinic Judaism

Religion is often hijacked to spread hate, but our faiths teach liberating messages about gender and sexuality.
What happened in Orlando this week is a human tragedy, an attack on all small communities and their membership to them. Nobody is exempt from being vulnerable to this type of killing. It could have been any of us.
Pope Francis's recent encyclical made headlines because of climate change, but his teachings are much broader concerning human responsibility to care for life on the planet. Good for him! It is time to bring the moral resources of all our traditions to this issue.
When we ask such a question or "Do animals have souls?" what are we are really saying? We are revealing a deeper existential and theological question about how human beings relate to other living creatures.
Some say that the period of Judaism we are now in, its institutions and leaders, are on the verge of major transformation. Many of us don't see it coming.
The eruv vividly demonstrates the dynamism of Judaism through the Jews' steady re-interpretation and adaptation of their tradition in harmony with the world around them. Yeshiva University Museum is currently presenting an exhibition, "It's a Thin Line," on the topic.
From ritual sacrifice, rabbinic sages established a new form of worship -- verbal prayer -- which enabled individuals and communities to regularly express their gratitude, joy, sorrow and regret without the use of bulls, altars or priests.
One problem Judaism is experiencing is the question of who is a Jew -- who needs conversion or "re-conversion," and how or in what way a person can or should become a Jew.
While some people think of science and religion as being inherently in conflict, I think it's because they tend to define "religion" as "blind acceptance and complete certainty about silly, superstitious fantasies."