race to the top

Republicans have long favored the use of competition to drive government reform. The Obama administration seized on this
What toll does poverty take on learning opportunities? How do we begin to reduce its effect on students? For the past decade
For the federal government, particularly as new unbundled offerings gain market share, accountability should shift away from
Educator and best-selling author, Dr. Richard DuFour, joined us to talk about the state of education today. Dufour believes
Join me and globally renowned thought leaders including Sir Michael Barber (UK), Dr. Michael Block (U.S.), Dr. Leon Botstein
Imagine an athlete training for the Olympic decathlon. The young man had been told that success would come by training specifically and constantly for the 100-meter dash and 110-meter hurdles. He did what he was told.
More than a decade ago, the district seemed helpless against the educational effects of poverty. About half of its students
We're living proof that though money alone can't solve a school superintendent's problems, a well-crafted personalized learning program does.
I will be glad to see NCLB left behind and RTTT stopped, but I do not see how ESSA is a victory for education in the United States. Does anyone believe that low-funded poorly performing states like Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana, New Mexico and West Virginia, will create meaningful accountability systems and tests that will expose the low quality public education they offer Black and Latino students?
Under Race to the Top and Common Core students, teachers, schools, districts, and states are evaluated based on high-stakes standardized tests, transforming schools from places where students learn to love learning into test prep academies.
Nowhere can you vote that Common Core Standards aligned with high-stakes testing have undermined education in New York State, stressed out students and teachers, turned curriculum development over to test design companies, and transformed schools into test prep academies.
The problem, of course, is the kind of instruction. What Obama and Duncan seem to miss is that as long as students, teachers, schools, districts and states are evaluated based on the high-stakes standardized tests, even if test time is reduced, curriculum will still be all about test prep.
Arne Duncan did not invent political networks. And yet, to use a term of education professors Janelle Scott and Catherine DiMartino, he has acted as a "gatekeeper" by bringing a private network to the fore in education, and further opening public education to privatized influences.
Let's start with Pope Francis' pedagogical strengths: Communicating with students and families, creating an environment of respect and rapport, and demonstrating flexibility and responsiveness.
Arne Duncan is leaving as Barack Obama's Secretary of Education. Unbelievably, President Obama found someone just as bad to replace him, Deputy Secretary of Education John King who in his previous job was New York State Education Commissioner.
Education is never either an independent force in American society or a principle agent for social change. It is a reflection of the basic debates talking place in the broader society.
Carly Fiorina recognizes the danger that a technology-dominated classroom -- a classroom focused on programmable skills rather than on messy and ever-changing ideas -- will become the location of job training rather than intellectual exploration. Education's great task, she said at a recent New Hampshire education summit, is not to prepare people for jobs, but to "fill children's souls," to make of them the kinds of citizens who can contribute to a participatory democracy. And that task, she insisted, requires exposure to music, literature, art and philosophy -- the very subjects that are currently falling by the wayside in the rush to elevate the STEM subjects to the be all and end all. From where I sit, this is just common sense, but it is not the common sense coming from the Obama administration (or the Bush administration before it).