racial divide

If paying taxes is an obligation of citizenship, a reciprocal government obligation is to simplify the tax code to enable
It has been 22 years and Darden says he is still paying the price.
When Obama was elected, people said we were a "post racial" society. That was a foolhardy sentiment from the beginning. Just because some white people voted for a black man was not an indication that racial hatred and bigotry were gone.
As we celebrate new beginnings with the start of a new year, let us commit ourselves to the individual acts of connection and understanding that bind our communities together. Let us build upon those individual acts to revive our common commitment to creating the world we all so desire: a world in which harmony and prosperity are within reach and our children are raised on hope and hard work, not fear.
Maybe one day, we white people may escape from our self-imposed hermetically sealed worlds that cut us off from the realities of our neighbors of color, a day when we become fluent in the multiple languages of "race."
We all have unfinished projects. One of mine is the documentation of the churches and music of people of color in Charleston. I grew up in what was then a virtually unknown town on the South Carolina coast. The racial divide was so omniscient that it was invisible to someone growing up in it.
The comment, with its racial undertones, came during a sit-down interview with the Peoria Journal Star and followed a question
Panel 1: Black Youth and the Police, 9:30 am to 10:30 am CDT Gilbert Bailon, editor, St. Louis Post-Dispatch DeRay Mckesson
Those of us with privilege need to be vigilant about standing up for those who are marginalized and oppressed. Like Joseph we need to find our hidden voice and courageously speak out for freedom and justice for all.
Ferguson, Missouri is about a four-hour drive east from where I live in Lawrence, Kansas, yet it seems a world apart. Like much of America, it might be easy to think Ferguson is someplace else, part of another, more broken country. That's the thing about privilege: it's invisible.