racial politics

I have long said that, as troubling as is Donald Trump, his goings on are not nearly as troubling as is the fact that so many people follow him and love him to pieces, no matter what he says.
Attica Scott's historical win is significant for so many reasons.
The sentiments that Donald Trump is spouting is like a balm to dry, bruised white souls that believe America is supposed to be a white man's country.
The swipe-to-reject sites models of popular dating sites can be utterly frustrating for people of color, because judgments based on photos are highly susceptible to the stereotypes and implicit biases that come into play when viewing photos of strangers.
Students' claims here not only point to an urgent and wholly reasonable need, but also implicitly invoke Yale's own policies, which describe college masters as entrusted with their students' "physical well being and safety" and with overseeing each college's "social, cultural, and educational life and character."
There were moments of disagreements between some, and those disagreement always seemed to ignore the opposing side's history in order to justify their own. This led me to think about how we have come upon a critical divide in this country. And I blame the internet.
All of my black friends have been told at some point or another during their lifetime that they "talk white." The person who says it likely doesn't know many black people. Black people are generally seen as uneducated thugs. I do not appear to be an uneducated thug. Therefore, I must talk white.
Many immigrants attribute their success in America to blending the old and the new, or to linking their past lives with their current one. However, Mr. Jindal calls on them to completely discard their old values for superior American ones, and to "learn English, roll up their sleeves and get to work."
The experience of witnessing the first black President in the history of the United States has indeed been a wonderment to behold. As it turned out, the grand old white establishment revealed itself to be petty, obstructionist, vindictive, and incompetent. History will remember them as such, to the extent history will remember them at all.
I lived and studied with black people, I felt comfortable around them and felt they accepted me, but I never had a conversation about race that made me uncomfortable. That changed when I met Chala Holland.
If we wish to get serious about helping the poor underclass instead of just policing it, then we must be honest about what is causing it. We must be willing to face our own imperfections as a society. It's time. And we can handle it.
Mitt Romney, the 2012 GOP presidential nominee and former Massachusetts governor, said 2016 Democratic presidential candidate
During my childhood I was aware that I was different in color from the majority of people around me, but my father and mother emphasized brainpower, not color. Color was what you were, but not using your brain was a choice.
I am struck by the different lenses through which identical events unfold and the challenges involved in unification.
Fred Rogers was a gentle soul who liked us just as we are. But if we place him in historical context, we can see that he was also politically progressive and fiercely dedicated to sharing his values of radical nonviolence and justice.
Experiments like Dr. Solomon's aim to create a visual representation of what beauty means, but instead it just reinforces Eurocentric beauty standards that have long been valued over other traits.
We’re in the midst of a cultural sea change to one of the most central institutions in the life of the nation. American attitudes
As well intentioned as we are in our dialogues and in our actions, the truth is as a society we haven't yet focused on the source of what has engendered the racial divide in the first place.
The divisive political figures Santorum admires tell us all we need to know about how he would lead America if ever given the chance.