Racial reconciliation

I'm tired of explaining to "friends" that the phrase #BlackLivesMatter doesn't mean that other lives don't matter or that it is somehow an anti-white or anti-police slogan. There is an implied "too" at the end of the phrase.
I made peace with the fact that in the United States I could be in the "wrong" at the "wrong" time and be shot and killed by police because a man or woman who feels threatened by my presence and calls 9-1-1. But I certainly have not accepted that for my Black, Chinese and Korean American daughter.
You live in suburban Atlanta and if I went for a run in your neighborhood before I left I would have to ask you a some questions. Do you have a neighborhood watch? Would I be questioned by your neighbors as to why I was there? 
The January holiday has passed, and I wonder if you're still thinking about it. As a parent, I am.
I had long known of his legacy, but I first, personally, met Governor Winter two years ago, shortly after I returned from graduate school to my home, Mississippi.
I know a cop, a "police officer," as he calls himself. I think an old fashioned job title offers the best description of how he does his work. He is an "officer of the peace."
Without black women administering the ministry, praying for the pastor, teaching the children, singing in the choir, cooking in the kitchen, answering the phones, photocopying the bulletin, and testifying to the goodness of the Lord on Wednesday nights, there is no Black Church.
The Diocese of Rhode Island is building a museum that will tell the story about how the church once profited from slavery.
I was already reeling from the video of Dominican citizens cutting the hair of a Haitian man with scissors as a crowd ridiculed him in the street for his dark skin. I prayed that the baseball bats and machetes would not be swung.
Jack* and I opted into the discomfort of racism, prejudice and the history of law enforcement in America among black and brown communities and Jesus met us there. We were honest about our fears, limitations and ignorance about the other because of our cultural lenses.