radicals

III. Here are some books about social democracy to help folks think about what kind of humane and livable society we'd like
President Obama forcefully pushed back against presumptive Republican Presidential nominee Donald Trump on Tuesday, calling his incessant outcry to use the term 'radical Islam' a political talking point.
I'm reading a book titled ORIGINALS: How Non-Conformists Move the World (by Adam Grant). In it, I've come across this passage
I hold both extremes - the Holocaust deniers and the Holocaust revisionists - as offensive to the good people who were all taken from us far too soon. Let them rest in peace. Let the truth prevail.
William McCants discusses the many hypocrisies throughout the ISIS ideology.
History shows that liberals need radicals. We need radicals because drastic change against entrenched evil and concentrated power requires personal bravery to the point of obsession. It requires a radical sensibility to look beyond today's limits and imagine what seems sheer impossibility within the current social order. And sometimes it's necessary to break the law to redeem the Constitution. No great social change in America has occurred without radicals, beginning with the struggle to end slavery. Causes that now seem mainstream began with radical, impolite and sometimes civil disobedient protest. But here's where the story gets complicated. Radicals also need liberals. Liberals can write policy proposals to their hearts' content. But unless they are backed by radicalism on the ground, they are playing in a sandbox.
Itai Anghel, an Isreali Jewish news correspondent and filmmaker with the balls the size of pumpkins, recently wandered into Syria and Iraq with a camera and not much else (no helmet, no bullet proof vest) to capture the front lines of the Kurdish fight against ISIS.
If conservative victory requires broad-based appeal, I'm not sure Horowitz's message resonates. He believes Rome is in fact burning, but that he is one of very few who have any clue of our predicament. That type of messaging is passionate, but its chances of success are doubtful.
The flag, as a symbol of the nation, is not owned by the administration in power, but by the people. We battle over what it means, but all Americans have an equal right to claim the flag as their own. Progressives understand that people can disagree with their government and still love their country and its ideals.
It's three years since the world-famous Pompidou Center of Modern Art opened its branch in the old industrial city of Metz, a couple of train hours east of Paris. The six-story wood and glass tent is far smaller--and some believe esthetically more daring -- than the mother museum.