Rafael Correa

The WikiLeaks founder's supporters range from Ecuador's former president to actress Pamela Anderson.
From Venezuela to Brazil to Argentina, the political left is crumbling, raising real questions about the durability of South America's so-called "Pink Tide." In Caracas, the future of Chávez protégé Nicolás Maduro remains unclear amidst plunging world oil prices, rampant inflation, power shortages and scarcity of basic goods.
It is time for local, state and federal U.S. authorities to connect the dots on Ecuador's corruption schemes that has spilled over into American jurisdiction.
Truth has proven to be relative and is often modeled after those who are in the position of defining and shaping realities. Sometimes simply overpowered by, sometimes in comfortable alliance with those powers, Latin American countries have experienced long periods of political and economic dependency, predominantly linked to Western concepts of free market trade and governance.
A Snowden accompaniment flotilla of prominent and peace-loving Americans could assemble at the Moscow airport, and fly together from Moscow to Caracas. Snowden could fly from Moscow to Caracas under the protection of our company, like the Fellowship of the Ring.
Much to the chagrin of the Obama administration, the unlikely Evo Morales incident has made Washington look like an international bully. In Germany, there are growing calls to assist Snowden, and meanwhile, South America may prove more receptive to the young whistleblower.
The only apparently meaningful leverage the U.S. government had to entice Ecuador not to grant Mr. Snowden asylum has been deftly removed, and the U.S. is now on the defensive.
By offering shelter to first Assange and now Snowden, Correa has embarked on a high stakes game. The pugnacious president is constantly upping the ante, casting Ecuador's plight as a David and Goliath struggle against the odds.
Whistleblowers should be able to expose government wrongdoing without getting the Bradley Manning treatment.
It seems Edward Snowden didn't do his homework on where in the world to apply for asylum. His choice of Ecuador as a safe haven stands in stark contrast to President Rafael Correa's war on the free press and refusal to endure dissent of any kind.