raising happy kids

That’s not what parenting is about, says Dr. Shefali Tsabary.
Most kids experience ups and downs and varying degrees of stress along the way. Teaching them how to cope with stress empowers them to work through the hard stuff in pursuit of happiness.
Everything feels REALLY MONUMENTAL right now, but if you could just stop and repeat these words silently to yourself, " Will this matter in a year from now?" I promise you that your perspective will shift.
Looking to raise a happy child? Make it happen! Not via the magical flicking together of two fingers but by actively heightening your awareness and taking action as needed.
It is no secret that our childhood has a huge impact on how we feel about ourselves as adults. And so, what better time to lay the groundwork for healthy self-esteem, self-talk and self-belief than during childhood?
I love the quiet mornings. And on the weekends, especially in the summer, I love the pace at which the house wakes up.
The neighbor we rarely see whose kids are grown and gone but still come home to pass footballs in the cul de sac. Whenever I see him and his wife I feel like we offer each other a trade of sorts -- a look at their past for a peek at our future.
As parents, we tend to get stuck in a loop of wanting our kids to be grateful for every little thing that they have. We focus on the stuff, but gratitude isn't about stuff. Gratitude is an emotional experience. Gratitude is about relationships, experiences and moments. Stuff is just stuff.
Raising a happy child isn't as simple as it sounds. That's because there isn't one single way to do it -- it's the combination
I parent each of my kids differently. I suppose you could call it multiple personality parenting. But I like to call it doing what's best for my kids. Each one of them. Individually.
It's easy to lose perspective in the day-to-day chores and moments of parenting that what you are really doing isn't so much about childhood, or even about high school or college. What you are doing is getting someone ready to be an adult -- and to live a life that is theirs, not yours.
When I ask my children where they want to go, I mean it. I want them to dream big and travel far. I want their answers to not match. I want them to have a Bucket List and Someday Dream. And then? I want them to go.
I get it. No mom is perfect. We shouldn't judge. We don't know what any mom is up against until we walk in her shoes. But that doesn't make us any less super.
Life is far too scripted today. Plans are made. Classes are attended. Craft projects are intended to mimic those found on Pinterest. Gone are the days of free play and creating something out of nothing. Many kids today are simply following a script.
Advice from experts and wise parents on raising little people who thrive. Keep in touch! Check out HuffPost OWN on Facebook
The girls played in the yard, but their restlessness and whining was gone. I could tell they felt satisfied -- the way you do when you've done something for someone other than yourself -- and they were made more content by the sunshine and crisp, cold air.
If you grow up believing that everything everywhere is attainable, life will really be hard to stomach when mom and dad aren't there.
If you weave gratitude and appreciation into your family's day-to-day life, happiness will occur naturally.
Before you decide that I am heartless and ranting, please understand that I wish happiness for my children. I just don't want them -- or me -- to see their happiness as my responsibility. It's not!