R&D

What if effective diagnostics, vaccines and medicines to test, prevent and treat Ebola had been available at the beginning
A commitment to keeping our country competitive means a commitment to educating the citizens of tomorrow.
In my last post, I discussed the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and why they matter. In this post, I want to focus more on how the agenda applies to the USA.
In the innovation and business growth book, Robert's Rules of Innovation: A 10-Step Program for Corporate Survival, author
The Defend Trade Secrets Act, introduced in the Senate by Senators Hatch and Coons, and in the House by Representatives Collins
In their interest to garner favor with U.S. companies (mainly in search of campaign funds), the U.S. Congress has allowed these companies to escape U.S. corporate taxes by magically declaring that their IP is located in some foreign tax haven.
I first met Evangelos Simoudis when he ran IBM's Business Intelligence Solutions Division and then as CEO of his first startup Customer Analytics. Evangelos has spent the last 15 years as a Venture Capitalist, first at Apax Partners and later at Trident Capital.
Gilead Sciences is an American pharmaceutical company driven by unquenchable greed. The company is causing hundreds of thousands of Americans with Hepatitis C to suffer unnecessarily and many of them to die as the result of its monopolistic practices, while public health programs face bankruptcy.
These are just a few random proposals, and there are certainly plenty of others, that would change the purpose and impact of trade agreements. Trade policy is too important to be left to trade negotiators who only think about the corporate agenda.
Global energy consumption is on a path to grow 30-50 percent over the next 25 years, bringing with it, in many countries, increased local air pollution, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and oil consumption, as well as higher energy prices.