Rebecca Solnit

Strand Book Store staff recommends reads by outspoken women.
After reviewing the horrors of global warming, McKibben reports how the U.S. and other nations could deploy renewable energy rapidly enough to reduce fossil fuel emissions 80% by 2030. Using a wholesale industrial retooling akin to WWII to manufacture solar, wind and geothermal equipment, the reconstruction would be ordered and partly paid for by the feds, using existing contracts as leverage to force businesses to comply.
A section on “radical futures,” with essays from Noam Chomsky, Toni Morrison, Rebecca Solnit and David Zirin, offers proposals
It's one of the jokes of our time that we Americans have literally plowed trillions of dollars into what's called "national security" in the post-9/11 years without seriously facing climate change, a phenomenon that, if not brought under control, guarantees us a kind of insecurity we've never known.
In a July 15 piece for The Cut, Maggie Lange nailed what makes the phenomenon so infuriating: "Mansplaining particularly
While these numbers can be argued about, they are striking evidence that, so many decades after the modern feminist movement was launched, the gender wars (male version) continue at levels that should shock anyone.
Of what possible use is it to imagine the end of civilization or even of the species? Is this kind of imagination simply a pessimistic indulgence or can it contribute to "green" and other positive results?
Some might call these the hand-wringing of San Franciscan luddites. Then again, you could see them as honest responses to a-century-and-a-half of immense urban change--change we're undoubtedly living through again today.
Head north, young woman (or young man), into the healing darkness that links you to the rest of us. No recent book I've picked up has been more worth the read.
Opening lines What's your story? It's all in the telling. Stories are compasses and architecture; we navigate by them, we
The largest antiwar movement ever to protest a war that had yet to happen had just packed its tents and gone home in despair, while George W. Bush and his top officials were in their “mission accomplished” triumphalist mode.
The buses roll up to San Francisco’s bus stops in the morning and evening, but they are unmarked, or nearly so, and not for
These are disastrous times for millions of people, and our zero-sum money system can only enrich the few by bringing pain to the many. Can we build an economic policy out of our shared crisis and find a common purpose in its solution?
Reading Rebecca Solnit's A Paradise Built in Hell, I was struck by the contrast to Naomi Klein's The Shock Doctrine that I had read the year earlier.
Does the name Lorrie Moore mean anything to you? To us, she's only like the best short story writer ever.