recess

Originally published on Motherly. By Annamarya Scaccia When it comes to classroom discipline, each school has its own set
Clinton's campaign released an ad with audio Trump recorded in 2006 in which he spoke of a "bubble burst" that he "sort of hope... happens."
Perhaps we should take note from some countries in Europe.
My fourth grade granddaughter recently asked me what I was thinking to write for my next blog post. She has strong opinions and great suggestions, so I turned the question back to her, and she told me that even with an excellent and innovative teacher that she loves, it is hard to stay focused on the work all day.
As kids turn to couch potatoes in this Golden age of TV, and with the popularity of Netflix, iPods and iPads, we should be encouraging fresh air and exercise as much as we can. I really hate watching recess go to pieces.
Four times a day, the doors of Eagle Mountain Elementary in Fort Worth, Texas, fling open to let bouncy, bubbly, excited
Instead of treating recess as an important, in fact crucial, part of a student's day, some schools still act as if recess is a privilege bestowed on well-behaved, compliant students. They use recess as a bargaining tool and withhold it as a form of punishment.
Being a kid can be tough. Especially if you are shy, making friends doesn't come easily. 10-year-old Christian agrees and did something to help.
A current trend in classroom management is to hold kids in from recess as a means of disciplinary action. The problem with this strategy, of course, is that kids need recess. They need to decompress, burn off energy and socialize.
Jennifer is a strong advocate for the need for recess and for the value of play in children's lives. In addition to her winning
Outdoor recess equipment, like monkey bars, can encourage students to take risks. This can be "very positive for a child's