record temperatures

Cracks in the Pine Island Glacier have "grown rapidly" in just the last few days, reports the World Meteorological Organization.
March through May 2015 was also a record high for that time of year, with global surfaces measured at 0.07 degrees Fahrenheit
This week, the Oscar race heated up, with Birdman and Grand Budapest Hotel leading the way with nine nominations each. In much more serious news, the planet itself continues to heat up, with NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announcing that 2014 was the hottest year in the 135 years since record-keeping began. What's more, the next 10 hottest years have all been since 1998. "The record 2014 temperatures underscore the undeniable fact that we are witnessing, before our eyes, the effects of human-caused climate change," said climate scientist Michael Mann. Of course, we've seen this movie before -- with alarming warnings about our steadily warming world repeatedly met with inaction. It's like "Groundhog Day," only without the laughs. Unless we rewrite the script, and push our leaders to adopt the long-term thinking that this challenge requires, we'll soon be facing a [SPOILER ALERT] very unhappy ending.
This past May was a scorcher. According to a new report, it was the hottest May in recorded history. Scientists believe the
The polar vortex plunged much of the Midwest into Antarctica-like temperatures on Monday. Chicago, Detroit and Minneapolis
Drawing parallels between rising food costs and the earthquake in Haiti redefines the word "disaster" specifically reminds us of its human causes -- and it is a clarion call for action, a warning of an impending humanitarian crisis.
When the Glacier National Park was established in 1910, it had 150 glaciers. This stunning collection drew tourists from all over America. Today there are just 25, and they are shrunken remnants of their former selves.
Mr. Will not withstanding, climate change easily has as much relevance to our daily lives as taxes, jobs, and health care (and is directly connected to them).
The warmth across the United States was widespread and intense, especially across the eastern two-thirds of the nation. Many states recorded their warmest March in the 118 years of such records, and it was the warmest March on record for the contiguous United States.