#recruiters

The one-page rule is an outdated myth.
One bad apple can disrupt a work environment and wreak havoc on communication, trust, and collegial relationships -- not to mention productivity. Protecting your team with a "No Jerks" hiring policy is smart and goes a long way to cultivating and preserving a harmonious and high functioning workplace.
Finding and investing in employees is an important measure for ensuring the long-term success of your organization. However, before you can hire and benefit from great employees, you need a streamlined recruiting and hiring system.
In high school, it was very clear of what to do to get to college. You get good grades. In college, it was very clear of what to do to get a job offer. You get good grades, internships and leadership positions in extracurricular activities. But what about pursuing a career that is fulfilling?
Like most Executive Recruiters, I only work with executives I know personally, or that I receive through referrals. This article outlines why the wrong time to meet an Executive Recruiter is when you are unemployed, and provides a few tips for putting your name at the top of an Executive Recruiter's candidate list.
Most of my companies are in regulated industries, so criminal record or a failed drug test is a deal breaker. Companies don't want to hire people that make bad personal decisions.
Have you ever met an amazing recruiter? Perhaps you met one during an employment search or one who works for your organization and brings you top-flight talent. If it's the latter, hold on to him or her tightly because these people are hard to find.
But how do you know if you're bringing someone on board ready to make lightning strike twice? One way to get you closer to finding out is asking these three questions during the interview.
TheLadders asked recruiters to review a stack of resumes while connected to eye tracking software. Their data showed that recruiters spent just six seconds per resume before making a pass/fail decision. However, what they paid attention to was far more informative than their attention spans.
Sometimes, external things that have absolutely nothing to do with you personally get in the way of the job offer or completely derail the hiring process. While, other times, the rejection is personal, possibly something you might have avoided.
Don't expect a recruiter to look at your resume and immediately understand where you would fit into their organization or to suggest which career path you should choose. They don't know you well enough, and they aren't mind readers (fortunately!).
When a headhunter interviews you for a position, they will be able to tell within seconds whether or not you are right for the position because they are already intimately familiar with these qualities.
A site will compare my resume side-by-side with a half-dozen other candidates who went to better schools, worked at greater companies and possibly had better careers than I did. It's so depressing; I'd rather watch my own colonoscopy -- polyps and all -- again.
LinkedIn is a powerful tool for sales and business development. It's also a great way to follow companies and get great content and viewpoints. But I don't want recruiters to call my employees.
Busy professionals get hundreds of emails a day. Distinguish yourself by picking up the phone. Leave an articulate voice mail if necessary and use a script until it becomes second nature.
Why do companies make bad hiring decisions and how can you improve your process so you bring only the best talent onboard? We look at some of the most common reasons for a bad hire and break down how companies can prepare to avoid these hiring missteps.
The way I see it, as technology develops, for many of us, we have ceased to leave work fully behind when we close the office door for the night, and I'm not just talking about Blackberry addiction.
With the holidays fast approaching, now is the time for your company to find talented candidates and fill those open positions -- before Thanksgiving dinners and Christmas vacations dwindle your workforce and applicant pool.
In 2007, I worked on a retention campaign within a small tech start-up. I loved my job and it was made even better by the fact that I hired most of the people on the floor that I daily walked.