recycled clothing

It repairs items and sells them at a discount -- so they don't end up in a landfill.
Let's be real: Just like your bridesmaids, the chances of you actually ever wearing your wedding dress again are pretty slim. So what do you do with such a pricy piece of clothing that was made for a once in a lifetime occasion? We've got a few ideas.
"No company, fast-fashion or not, can continue exactly like today."
The flowers decorating the earrings and the necklace were also made of this material, and were topped with sunflower shells
I do care about the environment, but it's hard to do so when you live in a city, on a budget. As an alternative, I turn to tech to do so for me. Instead, of becoming obsessive, I simply choose to go eco-friendly using technology -- a method that doesn't completely tamper my lifestyle.
Thanks to a few brave and benevolent retailers that have kick-started the new trend of clothing recycling, you can now redeem your tired and tattered threads for money and perks, and even save Mother Nature while you're at it.
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Whether your style leans toward rocker-chick or boho-feminine, studded embellishment is a trend that's here to stay. Incorporate it into your wardrobe in a kinder, gentler and more sophisticated fashion this spring/summer.
"Dave," I announced on our final night of the "How Poor Are We?" summit, "I am going to give up my clothing budget for six months."
Shoppers at a growing group of clothing companies can now not only buy recycled items or see a portion of sales go to nonprofits, but partner with brands that give them a more active role in giving back.
While we're out improving access to textile recycling in communities across the country, we are sometimes confronted with the notion that thrift stores and charities already collect most unwanted clothing. The facts don't support that line of thinking.
Every time I design a collection, I consider the multi-seasonability of the garments I create. When you shop, so should you. I am known as an "eco designer" and for my use of recycled/vintage mixed with new pieces to create a complete look.
Baabaazuzu, a wildly creative design shop in Lake Leelanau, Michigan, handcrafts vests, sweaters, scarfs, gloves and purses out of recycled wool sweaters and blankets.
"It was very hard to get our clothes 100 percent made in North America," says Litchfield, who was driven to keep his clothing